The Green Solution is one of the largest dispensary chains in Colorado. The Green Solution has recently opposed House Bill 1230. The opposition came in front of the Senate during the bill’s first state Senate hearing on Thursday, April 25. Interesting to note is the fact that the measure is largely supported by the marijuana industry, despite the fact that the bill would curtail the social marijuana use businesses.

Even though The Green Solution is one of the major contenders in opposition, HB 1230 passed out of the Senate Finance Committee, 4-3, on Thursday. The Green Solution, with its seventeen stores in Colorado, appeared to be a gigantic antagonist, those favoring the bill are extremely hopeful of it being reinforced as a law.

According to Jason Warf, the Southern Colorado Cannabis Council director, and lobbyist, “In the roughly 200 bills I’ve worked on, this may be the most thorough stakeholder process I’ve ever seen”. “Any opposition that’s coming out of the woodwork has had many years to do so.”

In contrast, according to the spokesperson of Green Solution regulatory affairs Counsel Tatiana Calvo, “The bill clarifies this issue sufficiently so as to allow communities to pass ordinances and resolutions that authorize consumption in a manner that is sufficiently restricted.” “The second thing we’ve learned through our conversations [with local leaders] is that each community is unique, and its governing bodies are most effective when they respond to the unique needs and concerns of their residents.” Calvo who is taking care of the lawsuits of The Green Solution during the Senate hearing holds the opinion that there is a new alternative for marijuana consumption in a different bill.

A group of social use entrepreneurs and dispensary owners have been pushing HB 1230. This would enable them to apply to the state Marijuana Enforcement Division for a tasting room license, whereas businesses largely those like hotels, restaurants, music venues and yoga studios could apply for private consumption licenses and limited pot sales; mobile lounges could also be licensed but not sell marijuana. This has to be done in parallel to the several reform and regulatory measures by the Local Governments in context to the licensing programs and ban certain forms of consumption, like indoor smoking.

“No one would propose that we prohibit the existence of bars. Oh, that’s right — we did that back about 100 years ago,” Senator Pete Lee said before the vote. “For a lot of people, there’s nowhere else to go, so this provides a space where it can be done safely and effectively. … I say we’re treating it just like alcohol.” Following the course, the bill would now move on to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

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