During January, a federal judge, Robert E. Blackburn, got rid of the charges placed against Pueblo County and a group of Colorado officials in a lawsuit stating that cannabis legalization went against various statutes that the government has eyes on in the District of Columbia.

Albeit the case does not seem to have national insinuations, the result should give a certain level of consolation for other areas of the United States that would like to change their cannabis laws without the possibility of being sued by a group of marijuana antagonists. This concern arose in February of 2015 by the Safe Streets Alliance. As a result, the owners of a Pueblo County ranch indicated that the addition of Colorado’s Amendment 64 went against federal law as shown through the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

Not only did the plaintiffs claim that the county was going against the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), but also that Governor John Hickenlooper and many other state officials ought to be found guilty of not doing their part in not upholding laws that protect the people of Colorado.

As an extremely simple level, the lawsuit called for the federal government to intervene and stop Colorado’s marijuana market to stay true to the line of leadership that has continued to put the voice of the United states ahead of the voices of individual states. However, Judge Robert E. Blackburn dropped in and put an end to their whining, stating that only the United States government has the authority to choose whether Colorado is going against the Supremacy Clause. Blackburn then went on to add that it was evidently not okay for individuals and organizations to try to ruin a state for possible violations of federal law.

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