Tags Posts tagged with "Medical Marijuana"

Medical Marijuana

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West Virginia Governor Jim Justice signed a bill that makes his state the 29th to allow medical use of marijuana. West Virginia is the sixth state to legalize medical marijuana in the last year and the third (along with Ohio and Pennsylvania) to do so through the legislature. In the other three states: Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota, voters approved ballot initiatives authorizing medical marijuana last November.

West Virginia’s new law recognizes marijuana as a treatment for patients with terminal illnesses or any of 14 specified conditions, including cancer, HIV/AIDS, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, and intractable pain. Patients whose doctors recommend marijuana will be able to obtain it in the form of pills, oils, gels, creams, ointments, tinctures, liquids, and vaporizable extracts from state-regulated dispensaries. The dispensaries will not sell buds for smoking or marijuana edibles, although patients can prepare their own at home. The law does not allow home cultivation, and patients can legally possess no more than a month’s supply at a time.

Matt Simon of the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) stated, “This legislation is going to benefit countless West Virginia patients and families for years to come. Medical marijuana can be effective in treating a variety of debilitating conditions and symptoms. It is a proven pain reliever, and it is far less toxic and less addictive than a lot of prescription drugs. Providing patients with a safer alternative to opioids could turn out to be a godsend for this state.”

One downside to West Virginia’s law is a new standard for driving under the influence of marijuana that erroneously equates impairment with a blood THC level of three nanograms per milliliter. That’s even lower than the unfair and unscientific five-nanogram cutoff that Colorado and Washington adopted when they legalized marijuana for recreational use. As MPP notes, West Virginia’s DUID standard “could make it illegal for some patients to ever drive, since many patients have THC levels at this amount or greater many hours or days after last administering cannabis.”

West Virginia’s rules put it on the less liberal end of a medical marijuana spectrum that ranges from highly permissive (e.g., California) to highly restrictive (e.g., New York). Eight of the 29 medical marijuana states also allow recreational use. Medical use was approved by ballot initiative in 14 of those states, beginning with California in 1996. In the rest, as in West Virginia, medical marijuana laws originated in the state legislature.

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VPR Brands

VPR Brands, LP (VPRB) Files Annual Financial Statement (10K) After Market Close On Monday 4-17-2017

Click Here: VPRB10K For Full 10K Filing

About VPR Brands LP:

VPR Brands is a technology company; whose assets include issued U.S. and Chinese patents for atomization related products including technology for medical marijuana vaporizers and electronic cigarette products and components. The company is also engaged in product development for the vapor or vaping market, including e-liquids, vaporizers and electronic cigarettes (also known as e-cigarettes) which are devices which deliver nicotine and or cannabis through atomization or vaping, and without smoke and other chemical constituents typically found in traditional products. For more information about VPR Brands, please visit the company on the web at www.vprbrands.com.


Pursuant to an agreement between MAPH and VPRBrands, we were hired for a period of 90 days to publicly disseminate information about (VPRB) including on the Website and other media including Facebook and Twitter. We are being paid $45,000 (CASH) for or were paid “ZERO” shares of unrestricted or restricted common shares. We own zero shares of (VPRB) which we purchased in the open market. We may buy or sell additional shares of (VPRB) in the open market at any time, including before, during or after the Website and Information, provide public dissemination of favorable Information. PLEASE READ OUR FULL PRIVACY POLICY & TERMS OF USE & DISCLAIMER

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There are dozens of medical marijuana dispensaries in cities across Michigan, and Detroit has 61 marijuana shops open for business. However, by this time next year, the landscape for marijuana around the state could be completely different. That’s when the state will start officially handing out licenses to cultivators, testing facilities, transporters, and dispensaries.

The state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) is beginning to gear up for the task of regulating a new, and potentially very lucrative, business in the state. The medical marijuana business is projected to generate revenues of more than $700 million, and if a ballot proposal goes to voters in 2018 and the market is opened for recreational use, too, those revenues will easily surpass $1 billion. Shelly Edgerton, director of LARA stated, “Most states have had two years to get this going. For us, this is a huge endeavor.”

Andrew Brisbo, who has served as LARA’s licensing division director, has been named as the director of the newly created Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation. He will be in charge of the department that could grow to nearly 100 employees who investigate all license applicants and ultimately regulate the medical marijuana business and administer the system that tracks medical marijuana from seed to sale.

LARA approved a $447,625 contract with a Florida based company to provide the monitoring system. They also provides a similar service to Colorado, which was the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. Right now, there are 240,000 people who have gotten medical marijuana cards that allow them to use weed legally to treat a variety of conditions. They are served by 40,000 state-approved caregivers, who can grow up to 12 plants for each patient and who are allowed up to five patients each.

The new law keeps that system in place but also creates five categories of medical marijuana licenses for cultivators of up to 1,500 plants, testing facilities, transporters, dispensaries and the seed-to-sale tracking. The dispensaries will be taxed 3 percent on their gross receipts, and that money will go back to the state and local communities. The state is still coming up with an application and licensing fee schedule, which will cover the cost of regulating the industry, an estimated $18.6 million, according to Governor Rick Snyder’s budget proposal for the department.

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A recent proposal aims to legalize medical marijuana in North Carolina. The bill lays out the development of a medical marijuana supply system and aims to create a program administered by the UNC system called the North Carolina Cannabis Research Program. The program would conduct studies to determine the safety and efficacy of cannabis as medical treatment and then develop guidelines for the appropriate physician administration and patient use of medical cannabis.

The political director of the marijuana advocacy group NORML, Justin Strekal, said the proposal is comprehensive and includes a long list of conditions that doctors could prescribe marijuana to treat. He stated, “Some other states have gone a much more conservative approach in terms of what they will consider marijuana to be a treatment for.” Strekal said there are states that only legalize cannabidiol, or CBD (oil derived from a strain of marijuana without psychoactive effects).

Strekal said, “The CBD-only is really great at treating the kids with refractory epilepsy, but as far as the much more holistic approach that can be used to treat a whole host of ailments, it’s important to have access to the whole plant. So, as far as medical marijuana bills go, we’re very happy with what’s being introduced in North Carolina.” But the federal administration and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions have been increasingly critical of states legalizing marijuana in recent months.

He recently said, “I, as you know, am dubious about marijuana. States can pass whatever laws they choose, but I’m not sure we’re going to be a better, healthier nation if we have marijuana being sold on every corner grocery store.” Whether Sessions and the new administration will actually enforce the federal status of marijuana remains unclear. Strekal said data suggests legalization of medical marijuana could reduce opioid dependency in the state.

Research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center found the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25% lower in states that have legalized medical marijuana. Strekal said, “The data is very conclusive that marijuana can be a pathway out of addiction rather a gateway in.”

Executive director of Drug Free America Foundation Inc., Calvina Fay, said she doesn’t think the proliferation of marijuana reduces drug-related deaths and overdoses. “Is there a state that has reduced their opioid problem and legalized marijuana? Yeah, I’m sure there is,” she said. “But there’s no proof that marijuana is the cause of that.”

In a speech to Virginia law enforcement in March, Sessions said marijuana proliferation will not staunch the effects of the opioid crisis. Sessions stated, “I am astonished to hear people suggest that we can solve our heroin crisis by legalizing marijuana; so people can trade one life-wrecking dependency for another that’s only slightly less awful.”

However, criticisms of medical marijuana are outdated and not based on scientific fact, Strekal said. He stated, “To maintain the same classification of marijuana in the realm of heroin is absolutely absurd. It’s unfounded, and it’s unfathomable to deny patients access to a substance that will alleviate their suffering.”

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South Carolina Representative Eric Bedingfield used to oppose all marijuana use until his son lost a battle with opioid addiction and died from overdose. The conservative Republican co-sponsored marijuana legislation. Bedingfield recently stated, “My mindset has changed from somebody who looked down on it as a negative substance to saying, this has benefits.”

Bedingfield now believes marijuana may successfully help addicts wean themselves from a dependence on opioids. He also believes marijuana may be an alternative to prescription medications like OxyContin.

Almost twenty years after California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana, efforts to let patients legally access marijuana are slowly taking root in the South. Out of 28 states that allow medical marijuana, only two of those states are in the south. Arkansas and Florida voters approved theirs through November’s ballot. A law signed in Louisiana last year, also not yet in effect, does not allow the vaping or smoking of marijuana.

This year’s renewed push in South Carolina is supported by some of the state’s most conservative legislators, such as Bedingfield, whose opinions have shifted due to personal losses or the pleadings of parents and pastors in their districts. Three years ago, state legislators passed a very narrow law permitting patients with severe epilepsy, or their caregivers, to legally possess cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive oil derived from marijuana. Bedingfield voted against that idea.

Bill Davis, a Christian author who leads a Bible study for people fighting drug addiction, said he was bedridden before trying marijuana. Diagnosed two years ago with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease with no cure, he was put on an experimental drug with “horrible side effects.” Davis said, “I had to decide whether I wanted to die of lung disease or kidney or liver failure.” Then he started vaping marijuana, which he says allows him to control the amount of CBD and THC he receives. He said, “I’m praying this state will allow me to be treated legally for me to live” using “a plant that God made.”

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Jeff_Sessions_Legal_Marijuana

“Wait did I read that correctly?” you’re probably asking yourself, right? Mr. Sessions has seemingly been the thorn in the side of the legal marijuana movement and he’s been a topic of great debate for days now. But there may be some shining light ahead to put a bit more ease to those looking at this industry and in their favor. Yes, worries about this “great shift” in federal enforcement in states where recreational legalization has been granted may be able to breathe a little easier right now.

There’s been an immense amount of angst and paranoia with regard to what some have understood as a government crackdown on recreational use. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has had private discussions with a few Republican senators saying that he doesn’t plan to stray away from the Obama-placed policy of granting states the ability to enact their own marijuana laws for their residents.

Sessions has been a strong force to be reckoned with after he ordered a review of the “hands-off” policy that President Barack Obama previously had. But apparently Mr. Sessions has had a bit of a change of heart and in private conversations, has assured senators before he was confirmed that he didn’t have too much consideration about drastically changing the enforcement laws; even though he’s not a fan of the drug’s use.

Here are a few quotes from these informed senators:

“Nothing at this point has changed,” said Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.)

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things. And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not the [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

-Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky)

“We respectfully request that you uphold DOJ’s existing policy regarding states that have implemented strong and effective regulations for recreational use. It is critical that states continue to implement these laws.”

-Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) & Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska)

“Do they really respect states’ rights? Then you should respect all of them, not just pick and choose the ones that you want to support or not. Many states have gone not only the path of Nevada of recreational marijuana but medical marijuana. How can you pick or choose one or another?”

-Sen Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada)

A group of bipartisan senators also had submitted a letter on Thursday that pushed for Sessions to keep the Obama-era policy intact in order to let states decide on how to implement recreational marijuana laws. Sen. Warren and Sen. Murkowski lead the effort; both of who are from states who’s already put legalized marijuana laws in place.

To date, 8 states and Washington, D.C. have laws in place that legalize marijuana for recreational use. Most senators who signed on the letter are from those states with Murkowski being the only Republican. The others include:

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington
Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon
Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon
Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington
Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts
Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii
Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada
Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey
Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado

The concern isn’t just among senators from those states but is an issue among many conservatives who are nervous about the GOP being selective about allowing the rights of states to supersede federal law.

“We’re concerned about some of the language that we’re hearing. And I think that conservatives who are for states’ rights ought to believe in states’ rights. I’m going to continue to advocate that the states should be left alone,” Paul said.

Sen. Gardner was even more direct with the opinion on Sessions’ comments, “He was talking about if there’s cartels involved in illegal operations, they’re going to crack down on that. That’s what everybody’s saying. I still haven’t heard Jeff Sessions say that. We obviously want to make sure we’re clear on what they’ve said.”

Despite the shake-up that Sessions almost single-handedly ignited with his comments about “not being a fan of expanded use of marijuana,” or how despite him being open to states passing laws that they choose, he made it a point to say, “it does remain a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not,” senators like Murkowski seem unshaken. In fact Murkowski said that she wasn’t alarmed and is simply monitoring the DOJ closely, “It’s probably a little premature to try to predict what may or may not be coming out of the administration on this, so I think we just need to sit back and see.”

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MCIG Sells Stony Hill Corp. an 80% Stake in its VitaCBD Brand

HENDERSON, NV / ACCESSWIRE / February 27, 2017 / mCig, Inc. (MCIG), a diversified company focused on the cannabis industry, announced today that it has entered into an asset purchase agreement with Stony Hill Corp. (STNY) for the purpose of pursuing mutually beneficial business opportunities in the Cannabidiol (CBD) Industry. Under terms of the agreement, MCIG will sell the VitaCBD brand to STNY, in exchange for total consideration of $850,000 in cash and common stock, and a 20% stake in VitaCBD, LLC, a subsidiary of STNY.

Paul Rosenberg, President and CEO of MCIG, commented, “MCIG has worked diligently to build the VitaCBD product line, but recognizes the need for a strategic partner to assist in branding and marketing of the product. After months of discussions and negotiations, we believe we have found that partner with Stony Hill. We are very bullish on the future revenue potential of VitaCBD and its ability to create value for our company and its shareholders.”

VitaCBD is a highly dedicated group devoted to engineering the purest hemp derived products available. Both hemp and marijuana contain dozens of cannabinoids, naturally occurring chemical compounds, but it is cannabidiol (CBD), in particular, that offers the potential for health and therapeutic benefits without the high. Hemp plants typically contain elevated levels of health-enhancing CBD, but by definition contain only trace levels of THC. This makes the hemp plant attractive to those seeking its potential health benefits as part of an antioxidant-rich lifestyle.

Chris Bridges, President of STNY, stated, “This transaction will expand Stony Hill’s platform of products and accelerate its growth strategy in the industry. Stony Hill and mCig will have a synergistic relationship, combining management and personnel with a dedicated focus on the promotion and deployment of the VitaCBD brand. We are excited to have mCig as a strategic partner and a shareholder in Stony Hill.”

About mCig, Inc.

Headquartered in Henderson, Nevada, mCig Inc. (MCIG) is a diversified company servicing the legal cannabis, hemp and CBD markets via its lifestyle brands. MCIG has transitioned from a vaporizer manufacturer to an industry leading, large scale, full service cannabis cultivation construction company, with its Grow Contractors division currently operating in the rapidly expanding Nevada market. The company looks forward to growing its core competencies to service the Ancillary legal Cannabis, Hemp, and CBD markets, with broader expansion to take place once federal laws change. For more information, visit www.mcig.org.

Safe Harbor Statement

Any statements contained in this press release that do not describe historical facts may constitute forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any forward-looking statements contained herein are based on current expectations, but are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. The factors that could cause actual future results to differ materially from current expectations include, but are not limited to, risks and uncertainties relating to the Company’s ability to develop, market and sell products based on its technology; the expected benefits and efficacy of the Company’s products and technology; the availability of substantial additional funding for the Company to continue its operations and to conduct research and development, and future product commercialization; and the Company’s business, research, product development, regulatory approval, marketing, and distribution plans and strategies.

Contact:

CEO of mCig, Inc.
Paul Rosenberg
paul@mcig.org

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By Jason Spatafora @WolfofWeedSt

“I fear the Greeks, even those bearing gifts.”- Virgil

The DEA’s recent cannabis research expansion is a Harry Houdini inspired smoke show of misdirection all to set up the next trick; there I said it. While some view it as a positive first step, I tend to think it served a very deliberate function. Optically it played directly into expected vitriolic fallout from advocates, activists and media touts, all of which lined up to ignite their “DEA should reschedule cannabis” torches. In a “perfect world” scenario these people aren’t wrong, cannabis isn’t Heroin’s equal & 1+1=2, but just as fire cannot exist in a vacuum, neither can a rational cannabis debate. And while everyone on the side of reason is shouting in unison about rescheduling they failed to see that they might have just had their pockets picked. DEA’s policy statement that everyone seemed to ignore there are 33 words that have the potential to create the legal framework for the monopolization of Cannabis by means of an exclusionary application process.

Prologue – August 10th, 2016

Russ Baer, a staff coordinator for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) media affairs wing gave a response to Steven Nelson of USNEWS.com via email. Nelson later shared a screen grab of the email via tweet. The statement made to him from this Drug Enforcement Administration staff coordinator read:

“Tomorrow morning (August 11th, 2016) the Drug Enforcement Administration will be making some important announcement regarding Marijuana related topics that will be published in the Federal Register. Because of your interest and/or prior engagement with the DEA on this subject, the DEA office of National Media Affairs is reaching out to you regarding these anticipated announcements.”

Over the next 24 hours social media was a blaze, with many people within the industry uncovering the fact that Rescheduling wouldn’t happen and that the DEA response would have to do with research. As expected, the incendiary scheduling of cannabis debate raged on into the following day.

August 11th, 2016

As expected, the Drug Enforcement Administration disappointed the advocates and activists of medical marijuana by not removing or rescheduling marijuana from its class 1 controlled substance status. Yet the DEA, in all of its benevolence, offered a consolation prize of sorts, by “deciding” to expand the study of Medical Marijuana for researchers, Universities & drug companies outside of the confines of a single federally legal facility. The facility, to refresh your memory is located at the University of Mississippi, (ranked 164th in Bio Sciences) and had up to this point been the sole research monopoly on legally grown marijuana, courtesy of the NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse).

DEA’s Misdirection Strategy

Over the next few days it seemed that every headline following the DEA’s deliberation was about the archaic rescheduling system & how cannabis is safer statistically than opiates that are schedule 2. Some media outlets went as far as to paint a “glass half full” picture. The LA Times for example did a piece titled “DEA ends its monopoly on marijuana growing for medical research.” The social reaction from cannabis enthusiasts, advocates and potrepreneurs from Main Street to Wall Street was as expected with everyone chiming in on social media to wag their fingers at the DEA. Representative Barbara Lee, a congresswoman from Oakland California stating via tweet “Politicians aren’t doctors or scientists. Marijuana research prohibitions are outdated, unscientific, & dangerous for those who need #MMJ.” As expected the rhetoric from the cannabis side was “The DEA is bad, the War on Drugs is a complete failure, Big Pharma is to blame,” so on and so forth.

IMG_8473

The people aren’t wrong on many of these points. The War in Drugs is a failure when considering addiction has been plateauing since its 1970 inception and US drug control spending is up 2000%, which to date stands at $1.5 trillion dollars. We can go on and on as to where that money went, what industries it created (prison industrial complex), the people it disproportionately targeted (minorities), but that’s a whole other article or book for that matter. Big Pharma however does have its trillion dollars hands in this story, but more on that later as I’ve digressed.

Not to go back and pick on the LA Times click-bate headline of “DEA ends its monopoly on marijuana growing for medical research,” but did it really end the monopoly? Let’s evaluate the idea. Yes, a monopoly is defined as “the exclusive possession or control of the supply or trade in a commodity or service.” The University of Mississippi was in fact in exclusive possession of the NIDA edict to legally grow marijuana and study it. On the surface the Monopoly has ended, but the reality is that we are just switching out the term Monopoly for an Oligarchy. Is an oligarchy any different than a monopoly in the sense that it’s just a smaller group carving out the biggest slices for themselves, eliminating competition by means of out maneuvering or outspending their opponent in an effort to influence policy such as this? Consider that the biggest lobby against the cannabis Industry is the pharmaceutical industry, yet they’re simultaneously studying cannabis for the purpose of synthesizing its many chemical compounds to create their high margin drugs.

Currently, their high margin bread and butter are the opioids for pain management such as OxyContin, Percocet and their generic versions of each. The drug companies are experts at isolating molecules from nature to create drugs that cost pennies to manufactures. In a zero sum game, cannabis is a direct threat to pharma companies, by snatching billions in profit and simultaneously causing billions in losses. Anti-cannabis lobbies would also be at risk as the pharmaceutical giants that feed them down on K Street would lose out on easy paydays. These anti-Marijuana lobbyists provide a micro look at the systemic problems within American politics illustrating how/why elected officials in Congress consistently vote against the interests of their collective constituency and bring forth carefully crafted bills or amendments like this one.

On the DEA’s policy statement and legal considerations section, under, legal applicable considerations it states.

“Second, as with any application submitted pursuant to section 823(a), in determining whether the proposed registrationwould be consistent with the public interest, among the factorsto be considered are whether the applicant has previous experience handling controlled substances in a lawful manner and whether the applicant has engaged in illegal activity involving controlled substances. In this context, illegal activity includes any activity in violation of the CSA (regardless of whether such activity is permissible under State law) as well as activity in violation of State or local law. While past illegal conduct involving controlled substances does not automatically disqualify an applicant, it may weigh heavily against granting the registration.”

Translation, grow marijuana even in a state where it’s legal and you are going to have a hard time becoming a manufacturer or researcher for the DEA’s new policy, thus excluding tier one cultivators in practice and likely creating a perpetual home for cannabis on the scheduling list. Prohibition’s end could very well be right around the corner, but the fear is in the form of legal medical marijuana at a Walgreens near you. I asked the DEA’s Russ Baer directly if the inserted language above in bold would be a non-starter for current cultivators wanting to become manufacturers as they are in clear Violation of CSA? In a written statement to Marijuana Stocks the DEA’s official response was:

“DEA is serious about facilitating marijuana research and that there is a lawful pathway for doing so. This DEA decision will facilitate increased research involving marijuana, within the framework of the law and U.S. treaty obligations, to enhance the drug’s supply available to researchers. The goal of this historic and monumental policy shift is to increase the amount and variety of marijuana available to researchers and make it easier for researchers to obtain marijuana as compared to current system under which marijuana must be obtained from NIDA. Growers must become registered with DEA, following the submission of an application, which DEA will evaluate in accordance with the CSA. Registered growers will need to comply with all CSA regulatory requirements, such as quotas, record keeping, order forms, and maintenance of control against diversion. Marijuana produced under this proposal may only be supplied to DEA-registered manufacturers and researchers, and only for purposes authorized by the CSA.

All potential new drugs, including drug products made from marijuana, are subject to the rigors of the drug approval process mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). This drug approval process requires that before a new drug is allowed to enter the U.S. market, it must be demonstrated through sound clinical trials to be both safe and effective for its intended uses,” stated Russ Baer of the Drug Enforcement Agency.

When asked if the inserted language also creates an unfair advantage for Pharma companies the response from the Drug Enforcement Administration circled back to the CSA (Controlled Substance Act) stating that the “DEA has adopted a new policy, consistent with the CSA and U.S. treaty obligations, under which additional entities may become registered with DEA to grow and distribute marijuana for research purposes. DEA will evaluate each application it receives to determine whether adding such applicant to the list of registered growers is necessary to provide an adequate and uninterrupted supply of marijuana to researchers in the U.S. In addition, applicants must demonstrate their ability to safely secure the drugs to prevent diversion, while abiding by the approved research protocol.”

The Controlled Substance Act

Everything points back to the Controlled Substance Act, a bill that was introduced into the Congress by Harley Staggers and took less than 6 weeks to get passed by the Senate and signed into law by President Richard M. Nixon. The signing of this document not only created the “War on Drugs,” but put an enforcement agency (DEA) in charge of Cannabis scheduling, circumventing the FDA in a move that creates an inter-agency firewall of sorts. The DEA’s position on why the FDA, who already regulates pharmaceutical drugs, isn’t in charge of marijuana rescheduling was point blank, “The Controlled Substances Act provides a mechanism for substances to be controlled (added to or transferred between schedules) or decontrolled (removed from control). The CSA provides roles for DEA and the FDA. Proceedings to add, delete, or change the schedule of a drug or other substance may be initiated by DEA, HHS, or by petition from any interested party. Once initiated, the process involves a deliberate and collaborative interagency exchange.”

IMG_8472

In Laymen’s terms CSA effectively says “DEA you’re in charge of this, FDA you’re in charge of that.” Unfortunately, Marijuana will never be completely removed from the scheduling list unless there is a major political overhaul in every branch of government, if and only if elected officials stop letting lobbies pour honey in their ears and money into campaigns. The reality from my perspective is that the DEA is a scapegoat, the perfect Boogey Man, simply because their job is to follow orders. They are soldiers in a sense, adhering to the guidelines of the Controlled Substance Act (CSA), a legal document crafted by a congress, molded in the image of benefactors, used to fuel a fake war and create cottage industries.

The DEA knows marijuana is safer than Oxy and that’s not speculation that’s a direct quote. They don’t want to go after the mother transporting medication to her sick child because they’re suffering from seizures. They want the dangerous individuals like El Chapo or the pill mills slinging Oxy off the streets. They have no interest in going after all cultivators following state law to the letter. Are there exceptions, of course! Does it make these comments directly from them any less true? No.
DEA’s direct position on which drug is more dangerous from a consumption standpoint as it relates to Cannabis vs OxyContin? “There were more than 47,000 drug overdose deaths in 2014, or approximately 129 per day, more than half (61 percent) of which involved either a prescription opioid or heroin. Marijuana meets the statuary criteria of a Scheduled I controlled substance, and has been determined to have a high abuse potential with no currently accepted medical use. Schedule I includes some substances that are exceptionally dangerous (including heroin and LSD) and some that are less dangerous (including marijuana, which is less dangerous than some substances in other schedules).” When asked point blank, what’s more dangerous Oxy or Marijuana DEA says “Oxy.”

Robert Capecchi, Director of Federal Lobbying at the Marijuana Policy views medical marijuana legalization as a means to an opioid end as well as fiscal no brainer with far reaching benefits.

“Ending marijuana prohibition will allow licensed businesses to cultivate, distribute, and sell marijuana to adults. Unlike the criminal market, a legal and regulated market means products are pure, tested and labeled, sales are taxed, and business disputes are resolved in the courts, not with violence. Additionally, there is promising evidence to suggest that legal access to medical marijuana reduces the rates of opioid overdoses and the reliance on prescription pain killers.”

Foregone Conclusion?

Prohibition’s end could very well be right around the corner, but would we want it in the form of legal medical marijuana at a Walgreens near you? August 11th’s ruling was either one of many dominos in the quest for the monopolization of cannabis or just a pessimistic idea based off of history repeating itself. Regardless of which reality we are presently in, it doesn’t hurt to try and connect the dots, but if I can leave you with one last thing it’s the number 6630507. In case you’re wondering that’s the United States patent # they filed for cannabis in 2003 citing “multiple therapeutic uses.” I can only postulate why they did that….

Regards,

Jason Spatafora

Drug War

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Biotech Buzz Could Focus On Cannabis

San Francisco will be a hotbed for biotechnology this week. The annual JPMorgan Healthcare Conference kicks off on Monday the 9th and goes through Thursday the 12th. But this isn’t the only conference and there will surely be thousands of investors in the city to attend all kinds of presentations being made, which are focused on biotechnology & healthcare. Outside of just JPM’s conference, the crowd around Union Square also consists of the Biotech Showcase, which sets up at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square; and the OneMedForum across Post Street from the St. Francis.

Biotech_Showcase

There’s also the StartUp Health Festival on Montgomery Street and other conferences. Considering that thousands of people who aren’t going to invitation-only conferences like JPM, it would stand to reason that attention will be on the industry in full force this week.

Recently Vitality Biopharma (VBIO) announced that it would be presenting at the Biotech Showcase on Wednesday January 11th. The Showcase hosts over 2,800 attendees, over 5,600 one-on-one meetings, and will be expecting to see over 550 investors present.

Biotech Showcase™ is an investor and networking conference working to provide private and public biotech and life sciences companies with an opportunity to present to, and engage with, investors and pharmaceutical executives in one place during the course of one of the industry’s largest annual healthcare investor conferences. Investors and biopharmaceutical executives from around the world gather in San Francisco during this week, which is widely viewed as setting the tone for the coming year…so JPMorgan is just the tip of the iceberg during San Fran’s biotech invasion.

“Biotech has historically outperformed the broader market during The J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference,” biotech analysts at the firm wrote in a note to clients ahead of the event.

And we aren’t the only ones who could be seeing the potential “writing on the wall.” One of the presenters at the conference has even said, “…there’s a growing interest in medical cannabis among traditional health care institutions. This is a growing part of what is becoming mainstream health care.” As we said last week, even though we focus specifically on marijuana stocks, the biotech aspect of VBIO could be something to pay attention to heading into this week, considering the historic impact that the JPM conference (starts today) has had in the past for companies that have a stake in the space.

We said that this week could shed some light on many biotech companies including those involved with cannabis. Now we see that VBIO will be at ground zero, not just as another biotech company that could benefit from the shockwave but management will be in the exact location and presenting to the exact audiences.

Company CEO Robert Brooke will provide a 30-minute overview of Vitality Biopharma’s business during his presentation and will be available to participate in one-on-one meetings with registered attendees.

Event: Biotech Showcase Conference
Date: Wednesday, January 11, 2017
Time: 8:00 a.m. PT
Track: Room 8 (Ballroom Level)
Location: Hilton San Francisco Union Square, San Francisco, CA


 

 

Pursuant to an agreement between MAPH and a non affiliate third party, we were hired for a period of 30 days to publicly disseminate information about (VBIO) including on the Website and other media including Facebook and Twitter. We are being paid $100,000 (CASH) for or were paid “ZERO” shares of unrestricted or restricted common shares. We own zero shares of (VBIO) which we purchased in the open market. We plan to sell “ZERO” shares of (VBIO) that we hold during the time the Website and/or Facebook and Twitter Information recommends that investors or visitors to the website purchase without further notice to you. We may buy or sell additional shares of ( VBIO) in the open market at any time, including before, during or after the Website and Information, provide public dissemination of favorable Information. PLEASE READ OUR FULL PRIVACY POLICY & TERMS OF USE & DISCLAIMER

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Vitality Biopharma Receives DEA Approval for Cannabinoid Pharma Development Facility

Approval of cannaboside pharmaceutical research included review by FDA and California Research Advisory Panel

LOS ANGELES, CA–(Marketwired – Dec 21, 2016) – Vitality Biopharma, Inc. (OTCQB: VBIO) (“Vitality Biopharma,” “Vitality,” or the “Company”), a corporation dedicated to the development of cannabinoid prodrug pharmaceuticals, and to unlocking the power of cannabinoids for the treatment of serious neurological and inflammatory disorders, today announced that it has received approval from both the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and the State of California Research Advisory Panel which permits the Company to scale up activities at its facilities used for the development of novel cannabinoid pharmaceutical prodrugs.

Vitality has been working with the DEA to ensure adequate on-site measures are in place to prevent diversion of Schedule I controlled substances. As a component of this process, Vitality’s preclinical studies for its proprietary prodrugs of CBD and THC were reviewed and approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA). The California Research Advisory Panel, a part of the California Attorney General’s Office, has also granted Vitality a research permit to conduct cannabinoid pharmaceutical development activities that are designed to enable regulatory approval of first-in-man clinical trials.

Despite cannabis attaining legal status within the State of California and in many other states across the U.S. for medical and recreational purposes, pharmaceutical research and development continues to be closely regulated by the DEA and FDA. Vitality’s work is focused on developing a novel class of THC and CBD prodrugs that reduce or avoid psychoactive side effects through targeted prodrug technology.

“We are excited to scale up our research and to aggressively pursue clinical testing of our compounds, and this approval greenlights that work,” said Dr. Brandon Zipp, Director of R&D, and Scientific Co-founder of Vitality Biopharma. Robert Brooke, the Company’s CEO, further states that, “There are surprisingly few companies in the United States that are properly licensed and developing differentiated cannabinoid pharmaceutical products. We are very proud of our team’s work to enable this milestone, and believe that recent discoveries have provided us with a very unique opportunity.”

About Vitality Biopharma (OTCQB: VBIO)
Vitality Biopharma is dedicated to unlocking the power of cannabinoids for the treatment of serious neurological and inflammatory disorders. For more information, visit: www.vitality.bio. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This news release contains “forward-looking statements” as that term is defined in Section 27(a) of the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended and Section 21(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Statements in this press release which are not purely historical are forward-looking statements and include any statements regarding beliefs, plans, expectations or intentions regarding the future. Such factors include, among others, the inherent uncertainties associated with new projects and development stage companies. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this news release, and we assume no obligation to update the forward-looking statements, or to update the reasons why actual results could differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Although we believe that any beliefs, plans, expectations and intentions contained in this press release are reasonable, there can be no assurance that any such beliefs, plans, expectations or intentions will prove to be accurate. Investors should consult all of the information set forth herein and should also refer to the risk factors disclosure outlined in our annual report on Form 10-K for the most recent fiscal year, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and other periodic reports filed from time-to-time with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Contact
Vitality Biopharma
Investor Relations
info@vitality.bio
1-530-231-7800
www.vitality.bio

 

 


Pursuant to an agreement between MAPH and a non affiliate third party, we were hired for a period of 30 days to publicly disseminate information about (VBIO) including on the Website and other media including Facebook and Twitter. We are being paid $100,000 (CASH) for or were paid “ZERO” shares of unrestricted or restricted common shares. We own zero shares of (VBIO), which we purchased in the open market. We plan to sell the “ZERO” shares of (VBIO) that we hold during the time the Website and/or Facebook and Twitter Information recommends that investors or visitors to the website purchase without further notice to you. We may buy or sell additional shares of (VBIO) in the open market at any time, including before, during or after the Website and Information, provide public dissemination of favorable Information.

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