Tags Posts tagged with "marijuana law"

marijuana law

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Cannabis shops and manufacturers have increasing concerns that the Trump Administration will enforce federal laws that restrict farming and selling the drug. This will reverse the president’s stance during his campaign and potentially overturn what has become a $7 billion industry. The worry was provoked by comments from White House spokesman Sean Spicer recently that the government would most likely boost its enforcement of drug laws.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions stated that he is “dubious” about the benefits of marijuana. He said, “Marijuana is against federal law, and that applies in states where they may have repealed their own anti-marijuana laws. So yes, we will enforce law in an appropriate way nationwide. It’s not possible for the federal government, of course, to take over everything the local police used to do in a state that’s legalized it. And I’m not in favor of legalization of marijuana. I think it’s a more dangerous drug than a lot of people realize.”

The comments have sparked worry with Chuck Smith, co-founder of Dixie Brands, a Denver-based company that manufactures topicals and edibles infused with THC, the active ingredient in cannabis. He founded the company in 2010 and now employs more than 100 people across Arizona, Colorado, California, and Nevada. Smith stated, “My concern right now for both the company and industry is just uncertainty. It’s hard to build an industry or a company when you don’t have clarity.”

The administration’s statements affected shares of Innovative Industrial Properties, which invests in cannabis-growing facilities and is one of the few publicly traded cannabis companies. Its stock price plummeted on the day of Spicer’s press conference and are down more than 13% since then. However, two other marijuana stocks, GW Pharmaceuticals and Cara Therapeutics, seem to have not been affected by the news.

Eight states now allow the use of cannabis recreationally, while more than two dozen states have legalized it for medical purposes. Twenty-one states have decriminalized cannabis. A recent Quinnipiac Poll found 71% of voters think the government should not restrict federal drug laws in states where marijuana is legal. Increasing acceptance has led to an jump in the market for cannabis in North America, with sales rising 34% to nearly $7 billion in 2016, according to Arcview Market Research. By 2021, the industry is likely to climb close to $22 billion.

Companies like Dixie Brands are charging that hike. The privately held company would not disclose current numbers, but in 2014 it was valued at $40 million. Smith said, “It’s hard for us to kind of go backwards. President Trump said he was going to allow this to be a state’s rights issue. We took him at his word.” Trump has sent mixed messages on cannabis. In the 1990s, he called for legalizing all drugs. On the campaign trail, he reiterated his support for medical cannabis and his deference to states to pass their own laws regulating the drug.

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Unconstitutional portions of the Ohio medical marijuana law, which had set aside a percentage of the state’s pot licenses for minorities, were spotted during the legislative debate but it lacked necessary votes, a key lawmaker says. The law will take effect September 8th, pointing to a new panel that will begin laying out plans for how the new industry will work.

Changes may lead to a marijuana corrective bill, emerging in the lame duck session. The benchmarks are contained in the legislation, heading off the proposal to Ohio’s fall ballot. Ohio is the 25th state to legalize medicinal cannabis. At least 15 percent of Ohio’s cultivator, processor, retail dispensary and laboratory licenses is required to go to an economically disadvantaged minority group – African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, or Native Americans – as long as an adequate number apply.

Minority Democrats had sought the provisions, with members of the committee feeling it was important to assure minority communities that had been disproportionally punished under existing marijuana laws saw some benefit when medical marijuana was legalized. However, racial preference rules are a violation of the U.S Constitution have generally failed to stand up in court. Legislators of both parties said that they were unaware of this.

State Sen. Bill Seitz, a Cincinnati Republican, drafted an amendment that would have made the 15 percent a goal, as opposed to a requirement. It was never introduced because champions of the bill said it might derail the compromise that had been struck to get it passed. The legislation had cleared the Senate by three votes. Eleven Republicans had opposed the bill, while six Democrats supported it – three of them being members of the Black Caucus. Interviewed caucus members who had supported the bill stated it was a Democratic-backed package of additions that led their support, not solely the 15 percent license provision.

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The Bureau of Justice Statistics has recently released their annual data on correctional populations in the United States, comparing the latest data with prior years.

The overall rate of 2.8 percent of adults in the United States being under some form of correctional supervision is the lowest since 1996. The trend toward reducing correctional populations is driven by changes in a few states, not all of them.

One way to provide some context here is to see which states have the highest and lowest rates, the most and the least amount of people in the correctional system. The states with the highest rates of correction supervision per 100,000 residents aged 18 and over are Georgia, Idaho, Ohio Pennsylvania and Texas.

From 2005 to 2014, the total correctional population in the United States fell by 241,000 from 7,055,600 to 6,814,600. The correction population increased in 26 states by a total of 283,100. So which states are increasing their correctional populations? The biggest increases from 2005 to 2014 were in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Colorado and Tennessee.

There is no clear pattern here with respect of state marijuana laws, but there is an interesting trend worth noting. Overall, looking at state data and adjusting for population, the rate for people under community supervision is twice the incarceration rate. Some states rely on community supervision much more than others.

Marijuana law reform and legalization are sound policies with great merit, but they are also part of a larger issue in the United States, the reform of the criminal justice system in ways that reduce the number of people under correctional supervision.

The good news is that many states are receptive to criminal justice reform, particularly ones that have already made a commitment to community supervision as an alternative to incarceration.

The bad news is that other states remain committed to increasing arrests and increasing correctional populations. These states, their criminal justice professionals, and their political leaders will present the greatest challenges to the legalization of cannabis throughout the United States.

Marijuana legalization may not be a top priority for Congress or President Obama, but the American public is doing what it can to make it apparent that marijuana is an important issue. Marijuana is becoming more accepted by the nation due to the abundant amount of data supporting its medical benefits and it is interesting to note the increasing number of people who support legalizing marijuana.

Support has increased at incremental rates

According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 53% of Americans support legal marijuana. The Pew Research Center has been tracking the percent of Americans who think marijuana should be legal since 1973. They broke out the results by generation (Greatest, Silent, Baby Boomers, and Millennials) and the growth is amazing.

  • 1973: Greatest (12%), Silent (16%), Baby Boomers (43%)
  • 1990: Greatest (12%), Silent (14%), Baby Boomers (17%), Gen X (21%)
  • 1995: Greatest (14%), Silent (16%), Baby Boomers (43%), Gen X (28%)
  • 2000: Silent (24%), Baby Boomers (30%), Gen X (41%)
  • 2005: Silent (22%), Baby Boomers (36%), Gen X (42%)
  • 2010: Silent (29%), Baby Boomers (41%), Gen X (41%), Millennials (58%)
  • 2015: Baby Boomers (50%), Generation X (52%), Millennials (68%)

Survey show overwhelming support

For the first time ever, the General Social Survey (GSS) shows that a majority of Americans favor the legalization of marijuana. The GSS is a large, national survey that is conducted every two years and it is considered to be gold standard for public opinion research.

The survey was conducted last year between March and October and researchers asked 1,687 respondents if they think marijuana should be legal. 52% of respondents said that marijuana should be legalized, 42% opposed it, and 7% were undecided.

The last time this survey was conducted was in 2012 and only 43% of respondents said that marijuana should be legal. In 2004, only 33% of respondents said that marijuana should be legal.

Numbers do not lie

Marijuana legality remains a potent issue in key electoral states, which guarantees that the candidates will be drawn into the debate. The presence of a marijuana initiative on any state ballot will also result in a significant increase in voter turnout.

Florida and a number of other critical swing states will have marijuana on the ballot in 2016. If a candidate’s campaign involves cracking down on marijuana, they are most likely not going to win the popular vote of many swing states which are crucial to winning the election. The marijuana issue may still be in its infancy, but the 2016 election will serve as a catalyst for it legalization.

Authored by: Michael Berger
Michael Berger is the president and founder of Technical420, an independent research firm focused specifically on the cannabis sector. He was working for the equity research department at Raymond James Financial Inc., when he recognized a need for a service that provides up-to-date research and analysis on companies that operate in the cannabis industry. Mr. Berger studied finance and economics at Florida State University and is working toward achieving his CFA charter.

Sincerely,

Michael Berger

Founder/President 

Technical 420 LLC

C: 305-458-9982

E: michael.berger@technical420.com

W:  www.technical420.com

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The newest update on cannabis in Colorado has been called “ominous” by those who are against marijuana in Ohio and “fear mongering” by “advocates leading up the Nov. 3 election.” During this election, voters will be deciding the legalization of Marijuana. The Rocky Mountain High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area released their third annual report on Monday, showing how legal marijuana affected the state. According to this report, there was a 32% jump in marijuana-related traffic deaths, an increase in emergency-room visits and in the amount of kids 12-17 using marijuana.

Another report which was funded by the National Office of Drug Control Policy revealed that school expulsions increased by 40% and many of them are related to cannabis. In addition, there has been more exposure of the drug to the youth and a 2,000% increase in the amount of mailings sent out to other states that have been intercepted. Finally, there were 32 lab explosions in 2014. According to Curt Steiner, a spokesman for those that are against marijuana in Ohio said that the report is “handwriting on the wall” if marijuana becomes legal in Ohio.

“There’s a lot at stake for the voters in Ohio,” Steiner stated. “A few self-selected wealthy investors are doing something that could inflict permanent damage on our state.”
Ian James is an executive director for ResponsibleOhio, a group advocating the legalization of marijuana. He said that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration “has already looked at this and confirmed there is no increased crash risk associated with testing positive for marijuana.” He said a Colorado Healthy Kids Survey showed “marijuana use among youth has gone down after legalization.”

“Yes on Issue 3 is a solution for Ohioans to overturn failed marijuana prohibition,” said James. “Without it, we’ll continue to surrender our streets to drug dealers who don’t create legitimate jobs, care about sick Ohioans, pay taxes or ID kids before they sell to them.”

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If anyone had any doubts on the marijuana boom and how strong it is, here’s reassurance for them: 23 states, and the District of Columbia, have made medicinal marijuana legal. Furthermore, in January of 2016, New York City’s Union Square will be introducing a medicinal marijuana dispensary to its block.  The dispensary will be on 14th street and in between second and third avenue. Furthermore, the dispensary will be run by a New York City based company that has been lucky enough to obtain one of the state’s five licenses to open a medicinal marijuana shop – Columbia Care. The licenses were distributed in July, and as of right now, they are all moving onto their grand openings.
The tension while the five licenses were trying to be obtained was very evident; 43 companies across the entire nation tried to obtain one, resulting in very steep competition. The licenses limit the companies to just one manufacturing facility and up to four dispensaries. The New York Department of Health decided who were going to receive these licenses. Those chosen are all going to be growing marijuana in New York.
Columbia Care CEO Nicholas Vita stated “we hope to move as closely to a pharmaceutical manufacturing process as we can.”
The other companies receiving the licenses are “Bloomfield Industries, Empire State Health Solutions, Etain and Pharmacannis.”
“The New York program is a symbolic step forward in terms of visibility and awareness,” according to Matthew Karnes, the founder of Greenwave Advisors.
Pharmacannis was a company founded in 2014 by Teddy and Norah Scott and Christina and John Leja, two married couples. Both husbands were lawyers and the wives have worked in marketing and human resources departments.
“There is no doubt that people really see and believe this (legalized medicinal use) is actually working and doing something, but what people are missing is how and why it’s working. That is where we are trying to take this right now. … We can be leaders in the industry for respected purposes,” Teddy Scott said.

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Marijuana legalization may not be a top priority for Congress or President Obama, but the American public is doing what it can to make it apparent that marijuana is an important issue. Marijuana is becoming more accepted by the nation due to the abundant amount of data supporting its medical benefits and it is interesting to note the increasing number of people who support legalizing marijuana.

Support has increased at incremental rates

According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 53% of Americans support legal marijuana. The Pew Research Center has been tracking the percent of Americans who think marijuana should be legal since 1973. They broke out the results by generation (Greatest, Silent, Baby Boomers, and Millennials) and the growth is amazing.

  • 1973: Greatest (12%), Silent (16%), Baby Boomers (43%)
  • 1990: Greatest (12%), Silent (14%), Baby Boomers (17%), Gen X (21%)
  • 1995: Greatest (14%), Silent (16%), Baby Boomers (43%), Gen X (28%)
  • 2000: Silent (24%), Baby Boomers (30%), Gen X (41%)
  • 2005: Silent (22%), Baby Boomers (36%), Gen X (42%)
  • 2010: Silent (29%), Baby Boomers (41%), Gen X (41%), Millennials (58%)
  • 2015: Baby Boomers (50%), Generation X (52%), Millennials (68%)

Survey show overwhelming support

For the first time ever, the General Social Survey (GSS) shows that a majority of Americans favor the legalization of marijuana. The GSS is a large, national survey that is conducted every two years and it is considered to be gold standard for public opinion research.

The survey was conducted last year between March and October and researchers asked 1,687 respondents if they think marijuana should be legal. 52% of respondents said that marijuana should be legalized, 42% opposed it, and 7% were undecided.

The last time this survey was conducted was in 2012 and only 43% of respondents said that marijuana should be legal. In 2004, only 33% of respondents said that marijuana should be legal.

Numbers do not lie

Marijuana legality remains a potent issue in key electoral states, which guarantees that the candidates will be drawn into the debate. The presence of a marijuana initiative on any state ballot will also result in a significant increase in voter turnout.

Florida and a number of other critical swing states will have marijuana on the ballot in 2016. If a candidate’s campaign involves cracking down on marijuana, they are most likely not going to win the popular vote of many swing states which are crucial to winning the election. The marijuana issue may still be in its infancy, but the 2016 election will serve as a catalyst for it legalization.

 

http://mic.com/articles/122955/evolution-of-marijuana-legalization-in-america

 

Authored by: Michael Berger

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House Judiciary Committee Majority Chairman Ron Marsico, Rep. Mike Regan, and Rep. Sheryl Delozier presented legislation to legalize medicinal marijuana in Pennsylvania.
Just week after what some understood as a crucial setback, legislators are making another attempt to legalize medical marijuana.
For Representative Marsico its a major change of heart. Only a few months ago he would only support a research-based standpoint. “It’s really hard to say no to the families. It’s hard to say no to the children, to those with serious medical conditions,” said Rep. Marsico.
House Bill 1432 would allow the use of medicinal marijuana ( in the form of oil, pill or vapor) within the Commonwealth. Going off of information obtained during the committee’s hearings and statutes in different states.

The legislation would:

-Create a foundation for a medical marijuana program to be administered by the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs.

-Allow a licensed physician to certify that a patient may utilize medical marijuana if they have a severe illness or medical condition.

-Authorize the department to register as many as five medical marijuana organizations.

-Develop an exclusive tax to be attached to the sale of medical marijuana, to be paid by the medical marijuana organization.

-Provide that all taxes and fees be deposited int a Medical Marijuana Program Fund solidified in the State Treasury.

-Solidify criminal penalties for diversion of medical marijuana, with the issuance of fake ID cards and the adulteration of medical marijuana

-Being clear on the fact that no patient, caregiver, medical marijuana organization, or practitioner will be subject to arrest or penalized or turned away by any right or privilege for lawful practice when using medical marijuana.

-Permit medical marijuana to given through vaporization or in pill or oil form. Edible and smoking will not be allowed.

-Require a medical marijuana organization to take on and uphold the security, tracking, a video monitoring system in correlation to medical marijuana.

-Charge the department with the task of giving a written report every two years illustrating the working of the operation of the act, an assessment of the advantages and risks to people obtaining medical marijuana, and any references for amendments to the law.

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