Search

interesting - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search

0 186

Although cannabis is now legal in Ohio for medicinal use, a panel for the state’s Supreme Court said recently that lawyers are not permitted to provide legal services for those groups and individuals interested in getting into the business of medical marijuana because cultivation, sale and use of herb still remains illegal in the eyes of the federal government.

According to a ruling handed down last week by the Ohio Supreme Court’s Board of Professional Conduct, attorneys are not only prohibited from lending legal aid to those people working to establish a legitimate cannabis operation, but these professionals are also forbade from using medical marijuana even if their doctor provides them with a recommendation.

The board’s advisory opinion indicates that, “a lawyer may not advise a client to engage in conduct that violates federal law, or assist in such conduct, even if the conduct is authorized by state law.” Furthermore, the decision suggests that a lawyer’s use of medical marijuana “May reflect on a lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, and overall fitness to practice law.” All of these factors, the board said, put lawyers at risk for ethical violations that could lead to disciplinary action, even disbarment.

Ohio attorneys can still offer the medical marijuana community some guidance, the board said. The only acceptable contribution in terms of counseling these entrepreneurs toward a prosperous weed-slinging business is to offer “Advice as to the legality and consequences of a client’s proposed conduct under state and federal law.” What is interesting about the board’s opinion is that it is a complete contradiction to the language of law.

In May, when the Ohio General Assembly pushed through a bill aimed at creating a statewide medical marijuana program, which was signed into law by Governor John Kasich, it came attached with a provision intended to make attorneys prosecution proof for playing a role in the medical marijuana industry.

Ohio attorney Brice Keller, who is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, told HIGH TIMES that it is important to understand that the board’s opinion is non-binding.

He believes that lawyers who are not very knowledgeable of the scene will simply play it safe and “Error on the side of caution.” Keller, who uses medical marijuana for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, said the board’s opinion of whether attorneys should participate in Ohio’s medicinal cannabis program is another issue that does not really carry much weight.

“The question about use is tough, because lawyers aren’t really prohibited from personal use in Ohio because it’s not criminal,” Keller said.

“A marijuana ticket isn’t enough for attorney discipline alone. The board says no use for attorneys, but that it’s not enforceable. It’s a factor, if that use contributes to other problems.” Ethics panels in a significant numbers of states that have legalized medical marijuana have ruled in favor of allowing attorneys to participate in the cannabis industry.

Boards in states like Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii and Maine have all made determinations similar to Ohio..

0 483

Although the marijuana community has been waiting for pretty much the whole summer for the DEA to announce that it was finally using its power for a positive use by rescheduling the classification of the cannabis plant to a ranking less threatening to the grand scheme of public health and safety, a recent report from NPR shows that the federal government’s anti-drug henchman have come to the decision to further defend marijuana as a substance that is just as dangerous as heroin.

This past Wednesday, reports began to come to light that the DEA was preparing to announce its long-awaited rescheduling decision for marijuana. The agency gave a story to the New York Times that implied that its decision had nothing to do with the fabled reschedule, though a separate problem altogether that was intended to allow more universities to get into the business of growing cannabis for investigative study purposes.

The Times’ report went on to say that while the DEA was throwing out the idea of removing pot from its list of the most dangerous drugs in the world, “This week, the agency did not take such a step.” However come to find out that was all just a big misunderstanding, as a report from the people at NPR would soon show a discussion with acting DEA administrator Chuck Rosenberg, who told the news source that the agency had turned down the rescheduling requests submitted by a couple of Democratic governors because the federal government was unable to clarify if marijuana did present some therapeutic benefit when used.

It seems that the recommendation provided last year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was that cannabis has “No currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.” Interestingly, Rosenberg wants the cannabis community to know that the DEA’s decision to continue labeling marijuana as one of the most harmful substances known to man has nothing to do with the fact that cannabis has never contributed to the death of a single person.

“This decision isn’t based on danger,” he told NPR. “This decision is based on whether marijuana, as determined by the FDA, is a safe and effective medicine and it’s not.” There was apparently a letter fired off to the lawmakers who petitioned the federal drug agency for the rescheduling that said, “Evaluating the safety and effectiveness of drugs is a highly specialized endeavor,” and that the opinions of doctors all across the nation carried no weight in the decision to continue classifying marijuana a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act.

What appears to be true is that the DEA is gearing up to officially announce that it will expand the amount of federally regulated cannabis to be grown in the United States for research purposes beyond the grips of the University of Mississippi. Although it is not known exactly which universities old Uncle Sam plans to let into his pot cultivation game, there does not appear to be any limits on the number of potential cultivators that could qualify under the updated policy. Many researchers have complained in the past that the University of Mississippi’s monopoly on federal pot cultivation was preventing them from accomplishing any real work.

“If you were a researcher who thought a product with high THC would help someone with a painful cancer, you were out of luck,” John Hudak, a senior fellow at the Brooking Institution, explained to the Times.

“You couldn’t access high THC marijuana in the same way you could buy it [legally] in a market in Colorado,” Rosenberg told NPR that as long as all of the new policies dealing with marijuana research is carried out in a suitable fashion, the agency might one day reconsider its decision to reschedule the cannabis plant.

“A clear and growing majority of American voters support legalizing marijuana outright and the very least our representatives should do is let states implement their own policies, unencumbered by an outdated ‘Reefer Madness’ mentality that some in law enforcement still choose to cling to.

” As it stands, the only hope for a less restrictive national marijuana policy is for the DEA and FDA to come to terms on whether cannabis is medicine or for Congressional leaders and the President of the United States to stop pussyfooting around and pass legislation that liberates the leaf once and for all.

Not much is changing with respect to the cannabis plant.

0 842

Prescription drug prices are still increasing, forcing consumers into more of a struggle. Some older Americans seem to be looking for a different medicine that has been more easily obtainable and legal throughout the country. Research put out on Wednesday showed that some states that legalized medical cannabis, which is common for symptoms such as anxiety or depression, saw a drop in the amount of Medicare prescriptions for drugs used to treat similar conditions as well as a decrease int he amount of spending by Medicare Part D, which covers costs for prescription drugs.

Since the prescriptions for drugs such as opioid painkillers as well as antidepressants dropped in states where cannabis can be legally obtained and used as a replacement, the researchers stated that it seems likely legalization led to a decrease in prescriptions. This is especially noted because prescriptions did not drop for medicines where marijuana can not replace the drug. The study, which was published in Health Affairs, looked at data from Medicare Part D from 2010 to 2013. This is the first study to look at whether or not legalization can impact a doctor’s clinical practice and how it affects health costs.

The results are interesting in terms of the debate as more officials are showing interest in medical cannabis. This year, Ohio, as well as Pennsylvania, passed laws allowing the drug for therapeutic reasons, making it legal in twenty-five states as well as Washington D.C. Ballots in November could increase this number; Florida and Missouri are of the states voting on the issue this autumn. A federal agency is thinking about reclassifying medical cannabis under national drug policy in order to make it more readily available. Medical marijuana saved Medicare approximately $165 million in 2013, the researchers stated. They projected that, if medical cannabis were available throughout the country, Medicare Part D spending would have dropped in the same year by nearly $470 million. That is almost fifty percent of the program’s total spending.

0 1882

Even after two decades, athletes everywhere still remember Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati, who became the sport’s first Olympic gold medal winner at the 1988 winter games in Japan, only to have it be stripped away by a positive marijuana test. After a few years, Michael Phelps became the poster child for stoners everywhere after the gold medalist admitted that a photo of him smoking at a party was legitimate. However now that marijuana is legal in over have the U.S. for both medical and recreational purposes, what is the newfound Olympic policy on marijuana, especially now as athletes gather in Rio this week for the 2016 Summer Games?

Fortunately, marijuana use within the Olympic world has progressed majorly since Rebagliati and Phelps, as a 2013 policy change by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) raised the limit of marijuana allowed in an athlete’s system to 150 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood. What this means is that as long as an Olympian doesn’t show up to Brazil stoned, or smoke during the games, Olympic officials don’t care at all about how much they smoke on their down time. In 2013, Ben Nichols, a spokesman for WADA, told USA today that the updated policy was just intended to disqualify athletes who smoke right before or during the competition.

He made sure that everyone knows that the rules do not prohibit the athletes from using cannabis products outside the Olympics. “Our information suggests that many cases do not involve a game or event-day consumption. The new threshold level is an attempt to ensure that in-competition use is detected and not use during the days and weeks before the competition,” said Nichols.

Prior to this policy change, four athletes tested positive for THC right before the 2012 London Olympics. Although this is a very small percentage of the thousands of athletes the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USOC), the threshold did end up disqualifying one athlete, a wrestler named Stephany Lee. Interestingly enough, Marijuana has only been banned from the Olympics since 1999. In face, Rebagliati was stripped in 1998 after testing positive for cannabis, however, officials had to give the medal back after figuring out that pot was not actually a banned substance. Marijuana is now on the banned list due to its heath risk factors, performance enhancement capabilities, and it’s against the spirit of the sport.

0 443

Donald Trump has just chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate, proving bad news for those who hoped for a cannabis policy reform during the next presidency. Indiana still holds draconian drug laws, where possession of any amount of cannabis is still punishable by a $1,000 fine and 180 days in jail. House Bill 1006 was introduced in 2013 as an effort to overhaul Indiana’s criminal code. A clause in the article called for lowering marijuana possession charges, where Pence refused to accept the lowered penalties and demanded a bump back up to a Class B misdemeanor for cannabis possession. Indiana’s archaic drug laws haven’t been updated partly because of Pence’s belief that cannabis is a gateway drug.

Pence’s belief goes against both scientific research and the opinions of Indiana’s majority, who in October 2012 favored for decriminalization in the Indiana Battleground Poll posed by Howey-Depauw. Interestingly, one of Pence’s more controversial laws opened the doors for a minor marijuana victory. Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act protected religious liberties and was protested by many objectors as an excuse to discriminate against the LGBTQ community. However, the same day Pence signed the bill into law, cannabis activist Bill Levin established the First Church of Cannabis, as a protected religious group that allowed members to partake in cannabis as a religious sacrament despite its illegality within the state.

Trump has wavered between support for cannabis legalization and condemning recreational use. With Pence by his side, Trump’s opinion could possibly change. Although vice-presidential powers are generally limited to tie-breaking votes in the U.S Senate, a running mate’s voice could be powerful and influential. With Pence by his side, there’s a distinct possibility that Trump’s opinion could change. Although vice presidential powers are usually limited to tie-breaking votes in the U.S. Senate, the voice of a running mate can be powerful and influential. Pence’s anti-cannabis rhetoric could impact the future of Trump’s campaign, and might influence the administration’s drug policy if Trump were to be elected.

0 598

Prescription drug prices are still increasing, forcing consumers into more of a struggle. Some older Americans seem to be looking for a different medicine that has been more easily obtainable and legal throughout the country. Research put out on Wednesday showed that some states that legalized medical cannabis, which is common for symptoms such as anxiety or depression, saw a drop in the amount of Medicare prescriptions for drugs used to treat similar conditions as well as a decrease int he amount of spending by Medicare Part D, which covers costs for prescription drugs.

Since the prescriptions for drugs such as opioid painkillers as well as antidepressants dropped in states where cannabis can be legally obtained and used as a replacement, the researchers stated that it seems likely legalization led to a decrease in prescriptions. This is especially noted because prescriptions did not drop for medicines where marijuana can not replace the drug. The study, which was published in Health Affairs, looked at data from Medicare Part D from 2010 to 2013. This is the first study to look at whether or not legalization can impact a doctor’s clinical practice and how it affects health costs.

The results are interesting in terms of the debate as more officials are showing interest in medical cannabis. This year, Ohio, as well as Pennsylvania, passed laws allowing the drug for therapeutic reasons, making it legal in twenty-five states as well as Washington D.C. Ballots in November could increase this number; Florida and Missouri are of the states voting on the issue this autumn. A federal agency is thinking about reclassifying medical cannabis under national drug policy in order to make it more readily available. Medical marijuana saved Medicare approximately $165 million in 2013, the researchers stated. They projected that, if medical cannabis were available throughout the country, Medicare Part D spending would have dropped in the same year by nearly $470 million. That is almost fifty percent of the program’s total spending.

0 1009

Friday’s (6/24) MarijuanaStocks Alert Is…
Advantis Corporation (ADVT)

 

How’s your day going? #Brexit fears have had ZERO impact on our new alert, ADVT In fact unlike many of the banking stocks, ADVT has actually been “banking” in a big way after quickly becoming a sub-penny that has now solidified its place above the 0.01 mark. Right now we see ADVT trending with heavy momentum making new highs of $0.0124 and stretching an already 100% win even higher…does this remind you of something?

Like we said last night, we don’t do a whole lot of “alerts” but when we find something that’s under the radar and has enough going on in the company that could become a catalyst, we like to bring some attention to it and so far today ADVT has begun to really wake up…and the last time we brought a sub penny MJ “alert” in front of everyone we saw it run from sub levels all the way to the low THIRTY CENT range. This could be just the very early beginning for ADVT in our opinion as we continue to have “High” expecations for the low pps MJ company.

If you’re just pulling this up for the first time, we’ve kept the full report below. ADVT has quickly caught attention today in a market where everything else is red. A little GREEN from the MJ space doesn’t seem to have hurt too much either and this could be well on its way to continuing the GREEN trend. Stay Tuned!

——————————————————

 

Who Is ADVT?

 

The company has most recently begun focusing on the medical marijuana industry. Earlier this year, ADVT partnered with Natural Elements, Inc. to supply the mutual benefit corporation with all the tools necessary to support its business. The medical marijuana business in California is limited to non-profit organizations comprised of member-patients that have received a prescription for marijuana from their doctor.

ADVT will be supplying Natural Elements Inc. with all necessities required to facilitate their organization’s growth and delivery process to its member-patients. ADVT will supply Natural Elements with agricultural equipment, packaging materials, product delivery solutions, and has put a cross-consulting arrangement in place.

ADVT will be looking to supply additional cooperatives in California, while it works to scale a more profitable business model through its partners (from seed to sale) in states like Oregon and Washington, where this medicine is fully legalized. Further to this ADVT announced JUST THIS MONTH that they’ve engaged in a letter of intent with Hemp2Health, LLC to provide high grade CBD oil extract for ADVT‘s product lines.

And here’s probably one of the most interesting things going on with ADVT: They announced THIS WEEK that they’re going to sub-license N2 Pack’s patented packaging technology to marijuana dispensaries. N2 Packaging Systems LLC has developed a packaging system that hermetically seals cans for freshness, longer shelf life and target branding. ADVT has secured rights to a packaging machine and license to sub-license the product and process to California, Oregon, and Washington marijuana dispensaries. And with built in RFID devices, N2 Pack technology allows suppliers to track, store and market their products to dispensaries and consumers.

 

Why “Alert” This Now?

 

Similar to what we saw at the early stages of our last sub-penny MJ alert…this is a company in the infancy stages of development. They’ve got agreements in place, licensing rights, and a nice LOI from earlier this month so it would appear that there could be a lot coming by way of confirming the progress of all of these building blocks that have been put into place.

Obviously we have “High” expectations and this could quickly become a technical speculation play that turns into something much bigger (those who saw the 0.004 to 0.32 run know what we mean). So in short, why alert this now? It’s at very low levels and there’s a lot that has started to happen with the company…these could be VERY STRONG catalysts heading into Friday morning and potentially beyond. With the way the rulings are planning to change for the scheduling of Marijuana and the upcoming elections, this could become a VERY IMPORTANT time to be watching lower level marijuana stocks.

So what do you do next? Simply put, if you are planning to be active Friday (6/24) morning, BE READY…we’ve kept our eye on this for a few weeks now and as we said above, we have “HIGH” expectations for ADVT. If this hits anywhere NEAR our last profiled sub penny mj alert, this could end up being one of the biggest alerts we see all year!

 

Want Our Updates Faster? Text the phrase “MJStocks” to 82257 Now & Start Getting Messages Sent Straight To Your Cell Phone

 

2 1359

 

Advantis Corporation (ADVT)

 

The cat’s out of the bag. Friday’s (6/24) MJStocks alert in Advantis Corporation (ADVT). As you’ll see, this is a very low priced stock trading under $0.01 and if anyone remembers our last alert on a company that traded under the $0.01 mark from one of the very few times we actually made a formal alert…that ended up running to highs of $0.32. Enough about history lessons though because it’s time to get down to business.

 

Who Is ADVT?

 

The company has most recently begun focusing on the medical marijuana industry. Earlier this year, ADVT partnered with Natural Elements, Inc. to supply the mutual benefit corporation with all the tools necessary to support its business. The medical marijuana business in California is limited to non-profit organizations comprised of member-patients that have received a prescription for marijuana from their doctor.

ADVT will be supplying Natural Elements Inc. with all necessities required to facilitate their organization’s growth and delivery process to its member-patients. ADVT will supply Natural Elements with agricultural equipment, packaging materials, product delivery solutions, and has put a cross-consulting arrangement in place.

ADVT will be looking to supply additional cooperatives in California, while it works to scale a more profitable business model through its partners (from seed to sale) in states like Oregon and Washington, where this medicine is fully legalized. Further to this ADVT announced JUST THIS MONTH that they’ve engaged in a letter of intent with Hemp2Health, LLC to provide high grade CBD oil extract for ADVT‘s product lines.

And here’s probably one of the most interesting things going on with ADVT: They announced THIS WEEK that they’re going to sub-license N2 Pack’s patented packaging technology to marijuana dispensaries. N2 Packaging Systems LLC has developed a packaging system that hermetically seals cans for freshness, longer shelf life and target branding. ADVT has secured rights to a packaging machine and license to sub-license the product and process to California, Oregon, and Washington marijuana dispensaries. And with built in RFID devices, N2 Pack technology allows suppliers to track, store and market their products to dispensaries and consumers.

 

Why “Alert” This Now?

 Similar to what we saw at the early stages of our last sub-penny MJ alert…this is a company in the infancy stages of development. They’ve got agreements in place, licensing rights, and a nice LOI from earlier this month so it would appear that there could be a lot coming by way of confirming the progress of all of these building blocks that have been put into place.

Obviously we have “High” expectations and this could quickly become a technical speculation play that turns into something much bigger (those who saw the 0.004 to 0.32 run know what we mean). So in short, why alert this now? It’s at very low levels and there’s a lot that has started to happen with the company…these could be VERY STRONG catalysts heading into Friday morning and potentially beyond. With the way the rulings are planning to change for the scheduling of Marijuana and the upcoming elections, this could become a VERY IMPORTANT time to be watching lower level marijuana stocks.

So what do you do next? Simply put, if you are planning to be active Friday (6/24) morning, BE READY…we’ve kept our eye on this for a few weeks now and as we said above, we have “HIGH” expectations for ADVT. If this hits anywhere NEAR our last profiled sub penny mj alert, this could end up being one of the biggest alerts we see all year! Stay tuned.

0 850
NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton announced on a radio show over the last weekend that cannabis is responsible for most of the violence in New York. He added that it baffles him that states want to legalize marijuana.
“Interestingly enough here in New York City, most of the violence we see — violence around drug trafficking — is involving marijuana,” Bratton added. “Here in New York the violence we see associated with drugs, the vast majority of it, is around marijuana, which is ironic considering the explosion in the use of heroin now in the city. I have to scratch my head as we are seeing many states wanting to legalize marijuana or more liberalization of policies.”
Morgan Fox, from the Marijuana Policy Project said to ThinkProgress that his claims are “extremely dubious,” and would be very based on exactly what “involving marijuana” means.
“It seems to me that that statement could only be true if you just count the mere presence of marijuana,” Fox added. “The mere presence of a small amount of marijuana at a crime scene or on the person of someone involved in a violent crime does not mean that marijuana was involved in or the motivation for that crime.”
Because of how crime typically plays out in New York, saying that most of it is because of marijuana would be a bit of a stretch. Crime data, thanks to the multiple pieces involved, such as levels of income to just coincidence, are very difficult to analyze. However, one thing that can be sure is that the cause of crimes cannot just be attributed to one reason, especially not marijuana.
In fact, studies have indicated multiple times that cannabis does not result in violence. Alcohol, which is legal, is very much more likely to result in violence and aggression. Various studies have also indicated that cannabis is less addictive than alcohol and that alcohol is actually worse for you than marijuana. Furthermore, a study from the University of Texas states that legalization might even decrease violent crime rates.

0 1232

Even though medical marijuana is legal in 24 states and recreational cannabis initiatives are gaining traction throughout the U.S., weed is still a touchy topic for most in the medical profession. Sure, some trusted doctors will talk openly about marijuana’s legitimacy as medicine – and many more are coming on board – but journalists’ interview requests to major hospitals and medical schools are still met with a nervous, “Uh, we can’t talk about that on the record.” Which is why Walgreens’ latest Tumblr post is so remarkable.
Walgreens, the largest drug retailing chain in the U.S. with more than 8,000 stores in all 50 states, is now tackling the subject of medical marijuana. Right above a recipe for “All natural fruit roll-ups” on Walgreens’ Tumblr is the headline: “What is medical marijuana?” And its tone is surprisingly sane and straightforward, especially for one of the largest pharmacies in the world.

“The healing properties of marijuana are due to its high cannabidiol content,” the Walgreens blog post reads.

“Marijuana also contains tetrahydrocannabinol, a molecule that can stimulate appetite, decrease nausea, reduce pain and produce a psychoactive effect.”

The post, written by Dahlia Sultan – a resident at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Pharmacy – talks plainly about cannabis’ dangers: “Research has indicated it may impair your lungs, memory, and judgment.” But it also addresses the medical conditions marijuana has been proven to successfully treat.

“Research has also shown marijuana provides pain relief in ways traditional pain medicines don’t. Medical marijuana can improve appetite and relieve nausea in those who have cancer and it may help relieve symptoms such as muscle stiffness in people who have multiple sclerosis.”

We’ve written about many of these studies, and we also covered the Journal of the American Medical Association’s 2015 analysis that showed cannabis as a legitimate treatment for some ailments – including severe pain, nausea, and vomiting related to chemotherapy and spasticity from multiple sclerosis – while its efficacy regarding most conditions is unproven in part because of research blockades.
For America’s largest retailer of pharmaceuticals to speak this straightforwardly about cannabis certainly signals a sea change. The Walgreens blog encourages readers, “If you’d like more information about the use of medical marijuana, talk with your doctor.”

As cannabis financial analyst Alan Brochstein points out in New Cannabis Ventures, “I can’t recall any S&P 500 company ever sharing such a supportive view, especially one that is involved in the lives of so many people who count on it for advice on health and wellness.”
The last line of the Walgreens blog points out an interesting if obvious fact: “Disclaimer: Walgreens is not a licensed medical marijuana provider.” Perhaps the company recognizes that – as cannabis-derived prescription drugs continue their march toward possible FDA approval – that won’t always be the case ?

Subscribe Now & Begin Receiving Marijuana Stocks News, Articles, Trade Alerts & MORE, all 100% FREE!

We are your #1 source for all things Marijuana Stocks, Subscribe Below!

Privacy Policy: We will NEVER share, sell, barter, etc. any of our subscribers information for any reason ever! By subscribing you agree we can send you via email our free e-newsletter on marijuana stocks related, articles, news and trade alerts. Further questions please contact privacy@marijuanastocks.com
Ad Placements