Will Arizona Have Better Luck The Second Time Around?

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Most are familiar with the motto, “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” and that is exactly what Arizona lawmakers are doing in an effort to legalize recreational marijuana. State lawmakers’ first attempt at legalization made it as far as the ballot in 2016 but came short on the vote. The Grand Canyon state’s lawmakers are at it once again, as a legalization proposal was introduced to the House of Representatives last week.

Republican Representative Todd Clodfelter and Democratic Representative Mark Cardenas introduced a new proposal to the House. The proposal is similar to legalization laws of other states. It applies to adults 21 years of age and older and permits them to possess up to one ounce of marijuana. The proposal also gives permission for adults to grow a maximum of six cannabis plants in their homes.

State residents may able to grow pot in their homes, but they will only be allowed to smoke it there too. Smoking marijuana in public will remain illegal. It also proposes that cities and towns will be able to decide if they will permit marijuana business to operate within their jurisdictions. Employers will also have control on regulations regarding their employees and marijuana consumption while at work.

Arizona’s current medical marijuana laws will remain the same. However, the proposal would establish a taxing system for recreational marijuana sales which could generate a nice chunk of change for the state to use how they see fit.

Clodfelter’s and Cardenas’ proposal may give the residents of the state another shot at legalization. If both the House of Representatives and the Senate give the proposal their stamps of approval, voters will see it on the ballot come November.

So, the question remains, will Arizona have better luck the second time around? Although the thought of a bipartisan legalization proposal is music to marijuana advocates’ ears, there still disapproval of legalization from Republicans throughout the state.

All that can be done now is hope for the best, as the House mulls over Clodfelter’s and Cardenas’ proposal. If passed it will then make its way to the Senate. Stay tuned, Arizona.

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