Why Marijuana Advocates Might be Attracted to Trump

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One big issue this election has set it apart from all of the other elections in the past. One of the biggest issues of the 2016 election is marijuana legalization. The extraordinary number of cannabis measures on the ticket in November, incorporating into two swing states, could muddle turnout in the 2016 presidential race, bringing out more voters, yet not dependable for any applicant.

At first look, the customary demographic of pot voters – white, youthful, male, Democratic – would probably build votes in favor of Clinton. In any case, with the Libertarian applicant (and known pot lover), Gary Johnson, having the most obvious opportunity since Nader to siphon votes far from a standard hopeful, and the erratic dependability of partisan principal voters this year, it’s not ensured that Clinton will have the capacity to capitalize on the force of pot.

“Polls show that there’s a trend toward marijuana legalization, so the energy behind this issue seems to be on the legalization side,” Geoffrey Skelley, media relations coordinator for the University of Virginia’s Center For Politics, stated. “So if there are citizens who turn out and vote because of this issue, it’s probably going to favor Democrats.”

In any case, Skelley highlights, a specific cut of voters persuaded by weed legislative issues may not bolster Clinton or Trump.

“You’re talking about a group that’s more white male than not, and even at younger ages, they don’t view Clinton favorably. Romney won 18- to 29-year-old white men in 2012, and that’s a group Trump should hope to be winning. So he should be worried that Gary Johnson could steal some votes from him there. After all, young men who are white are a potentially good voting group for Johnson, so higher turnout related to marijuana legalization might hurt Trump, even at the margins.”

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