Tags Posts tagged with "Recreational"

Recreational

0 1669

Kimberly Cargile opened A Therapeutic Alternative Shop in 2009. She says her store serves more than 40,000 patients throughout California. In addition to buying marijuana products, patients can also take advantage of free services like massage therapy and yoga. Cargile stated, “I believe that a patient has a right to heal themselves by all means necessary. So we really are on the cutting edge.” There are 30 dispensaries in Sacramento that serve individuals with a doctor’s prescription for medical cannabis.

That number will soon increase as thousands of applications are expected for dispensaries that will sell cannabis to recreational users. A doctor’s prescription for cannabis is no longer necessary under the state’s Adult Use of Marijuana Act, but until 2018 there is no store where a person can legally buy marijuana without a prescription. The question is whether existing shops will open their businesses to recreational users next year. Cargile said, “We will stay medical. There are plenty of legit patients who come to us who really need our services. We believe that we’ll be able to stay sustainable in the face of quite a bit of competition from recreational stores.”

Nate Bradley, executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association, says he’s spoken to dispensary owners who want to stay medical. But Bradley says many of them have changed their minds. He stated, “It’s just expanding your market. If you’re a business owner, why would you not want to expand your market?” Bradley says Prop 64 was written to complement California’s existing legal framework for medical cannabis. He says the goal is to have one system with two sets of retail licenses, one for medical cannabis and another for recreational marijuana. Bradley said, “But that is what we’d like to see for the long run instead of creating the bureaucracy of two separate systems with two separate sets of rules you have to be in compliance with.”

0 2871

A new proposal before legislators in Salem is arranged to protect people who purchase cannabis in Oregon. It’s considered emergency legislation, which means that if passed, it would immediately take effect. This proposal comes after comments from the federal government about pushing back on the six states that have legalized cannabis. Back on February 24, 2017, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said, “I do believe you will see greater enforcement of it.”

When asked about medical cannabis, Spicer stated, “that is very different than recreational use, which is something the Department of Justice, I think, will be further looking into.” Currently, when you buy marijuana in Oregon, the business records your identification information to ensure you’re not purchasing more than the legal amount per day. The CEO of Cannabliss & Co. in Portland, Matt Price, says the need for minimal identification information is to ensure buyers are staying within the legal limit.

Price stated, “If I have to purge the system and come up with some crazy way to track individuals it would be easy for people to abuse those powers.” Senate Bill 863 does two things. First, cannabis dispensaries or retailers wouldn’t be able to keep anyone’s information for more than four days. Second, it would make it illegal for the retailer or dispensary to give anyone’s information to anyone else. On the bottom of the bill’s summary it states the emergency act is “necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety.”

Price stated, “There is a lot of fear in a new administration I think these guys are going to be a little more stringent but I don’t think they are going to be messing with any licensed legal state business.” Senator Floyd Prozanski is one of the key supporters of the bill he says the goal is to ensure voters got what they were expecting when they passed Measure 91. He says the hope would be to get the marijuana industry to be more like the alcohol industry, meaning marijuana stores check age but don’t keep consumers’ personal information.

0 2721

Israel’s cabinet recently approved a proposal to decriminalize the recreational use of marijuana, permitting it to go to a vote in the country’s parliament, the Knesset. If it passes there, as anticipated, first-time marijuana offenders will face a fine of 1,000 shekels ($270 USD), but criminal charges will only be brought on a fourth offense. Gilad Erdan, Public Security Minister who led the reform effort said, “The government’s approval is an important step on the way to implement the new policy, which will emphasize public information and treatment instead of criminal enforcement.”

Legislator Tamar Zandberg of the center-left Meretz party, chair of the Knesset Special Committee on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, stated, “This is an important step, but not the end of the road. It sends a message that a million of Israelis who consume marijuana aren’t criminals. We will carry on following the details in the committee and ensure that the change is implemented.” The proposal was based on the suggestions of a committee headed by Public Security Ministry director-general Rotem Peleg, calling for a change of focus from criminal prosecution of marijuana users to fines and educational campaigns.

Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked stated, “Israel cannot shut its eyes to the changes being made across the world in respect to marijuana consumption and its effect. Israel is already a world leader in medical cannabis, with some 25,000 registered in its national program, and cutting-edge research underway. According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, almost 9% of Israelis use marijuana, although many believe the figure could be higher. For now, Israel’s predominantly conservative government is only going so far. Farming and selling marijuana would continue to be criminal offenses under the proposal.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stated, “On the one hand we are opening ourselves up to the future. On the other hand, we understand the dangers and will try to balance the two.” However, even some conservatives are coming around. MK Sharren Haskel of the right-wing Likud, chair of the Knesset Caucus for Medical Cannabis, said the proposal is “not enough.” Asserting that “criminalization does not work and wastes resources.” She stated, “I will keep fighting until we have a full-fledged legalization of cannabis.”

0 1409

Legislators in New York are hoping that the recent legalization of cannabis in Maine and Massachusetts will motivate the state’s legislative forces to take similar action in the 2017 session. Two bills (A3506 and S3040) were introduced in the New York General Assembly recently, and in the Senate targeted constructing a system that would allow cannabis to be regulated and taxed across the state in a fashion like alcohol. The ideas would enact the “Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act.” This would give adults 18 and older the right to possess up to two ounces of marijuana and grow as many as six plants for personal use.

The proposal reads, “The intent of this act is to regulate, control, and tax marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol, generate millions of dollars in new revenue, prevent access to marijuana by those under the age of eighteen years, reduce the illegal drug market and reduce violent crime, reduce the racially disparate impact of existing marijuana laws, allow industrial hemp to be farmed in New York state, and create new industries and increase employment.” There are people who believe that the evolving cannabis laws in parts of New England might be enough to add pressure to state legislators in 2017 and get them to take the issue of marijuana reform a little more seriously than they have before.

It has been a year since the state put its medical cannabis program into play. However, the Cuomo administration seems to have opened its eyes to some of the issues surrounding the Compassionate Care Act. State health officials recently made some critical changes to the program, including adding chronic pain to its list of qualified conditions. Cuomo said last month that he intends to clarify the state’s decades old decriminalization law, a move intended to stop people from going to jail for simply holding a little marijuana. Cuomo stated, “The illegal sale of marijuana cannot and will not be tolerated in New York State, but data consistently show that recreational users of marijuana pose little to no threat to public safety.” However, it’s likely that the idea of fully legalizing cannabis in New York will make the state’s law enforcement agencies a little worried and maybe cause them to put up some resistance.

0 883

San Diego became the first major urban area in the state to prepare for the recreational marijuana sales allowed under Prop. 64, the cannabis legalization ballot measure approved by voters in November, as reported by The San Diego Union Tribune. It is legal for all adults 21 and over in California to consume, grow, and possess cannabis, but the only places where it can be bought legally are existing medical marijuana dispensaries. Retail pot stores may open as early as January 1, 2018. Cities and counties need to allow dispensaries, and state legislators need to create statewide guidelines for recreational cannabis farming, sales, and testing.

January 1st as the first day of sales is now looking vague, as some state legislators have called for a delay in order to have more time to create guidelines. However, as San Diego’s City Council proved, less than two months is plenty of time to get it done. All 15 of San Diego’s current licensed medical cannabis dispensaries will be allowed to sell recreational marijuana as well, once the state proposals come through, the newspaper reported. Any future dispensaries will also be able to sell to all consumers over the age of 21.

Later this year, the council will deliberate legalizing commercial cannabis farming, distribution, and lab testing. Police had recommended that all of the above be banned “based on concerns about crime and other potential problems.” The basis for those worries was judged and believed to be weak. Particularly weak, considering 62% of San Diego voters approved Prop. 64, and the city could rake in almost $30 million per year in tax revenue. San Diego is the first major city in California to prepare for sales of recreational marijuana, which means the city is ahead of San Francisco, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Jose, and Sacramento in getting ready for pot’s legal future.

0 1843

California farms, sells, and consumes billions of dollars worth of cannabis. For more than ten years, medicinal cannabis cardholders have been able to purchase marijuana over the counter in licensed dispensaries, who remit taxes to the state and federal governments. Still, figuring out how to do the same with recreational cannabis retail stores, something four other states have figured out, is turning out to be too complicated for the world’s seventh largest economy.

When a big majority of California voters were in favor of Prop. 64 and legalized recreational cannabis use and growing for adults 21 and over, they also set a date for when retail sales would be able to start, January 1, 2018. Sometime in between that day and Election Day, lawmakers would have to come up with a set of rules. That’s the same time frame legislators in Colorado had to set up the nation’s first legal sale. However, according to legislators in California, including those for whom cannabis is supposed to be a problem, it just is not enough time.

“Being blunt, there is no way the state of California can meet all of the deadlines before we go live on January 1, 2018,” state Senator Mike McGuire told the Sacramento Bee. “We are building the regulatory system for a multibillion dollar industry from scratch.” Even if Colorado, then Washington, then Oregon, and then Alaska had not provided California with a model to follow, the state in 2015 passed regulations for medicinal cannabis. Prop. 64 was specifically modeled after the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown in fall 2015. Legislators like McGuire, who represents a cannabis-growing region, and yet opposed Prop. 64, were on the hook for finalizing a host of details before licenses to grow, transport, test, and sell medical marijuana were issued.

And in over a year, they haven’t gotten around to that so they can’t possibly be expected to figure it out in less than a year. This heel-dragging is being seen all across the United States. Legislators in Massachusetts want to set back the start of recreational cannabis sales thereby as much as two years. It is common as lawmakers really have no incentive to delay.

0 1363

Lawmakers in Massachusetts went through a 6 month delay in the sale of cannabis for recreational use,saying they needed more time to dabble with a legalization measure that voters accepted in November.
According to a copy of the legislation posted online, House and Senate voted to push back the licensing of marijuana shops from January 1, 2018 til July 1, 2018. Personal use, possession, and cultivation became legal on December 15, making Massachusetts one of eight states in the country to take that step since voters in Washington and Colorado first approved the idea in 2012.

President-elect Donald Trump plans to leave this hanging after he is sworn in on January. 20. Marijuana still remains illegal at the federal level. Only by the Obama administration has the legalization occurred.
Democrat Senate President Stan Rosenberg of Massachusetts announced public health and safety are the reasons for the delay in sales. He said, “This short delay will allow the necessary time for the legislature to work with stakeholders on improving the new law.” Rosenberg stated, “Luckily, we are in a position where we can learn from the experiences of other states to implement the most responsible recreational marijuana law in the country.”

Legislation pushed back all deadlines in relation to retail sales, regulation, and taxes. A “cannabis control commission” that was to be appointed by March 1 is given a deadline to materialize by September 1.
Jim Borghesani (who ran the campaign to legalize cannabis in MA) said advocates learned of the legislation on Tuesday night. “We’re very disappointed with what they did and with the way they did it,” he stated. “We’re disappointed that they extended this awkward period we’re in now where possession is legal but sales are not.” Republican Governor Charlie Baker is expected to sign the delay bill into law. Spokeswoman Lizzy Guyton said this will work with public health officials to put legalization into place.

0 1629

Daniel Landes; owner of “City O’ City,” a popular restaurant, considers his options a few days after Denver voters approve the use of marijuana in bars, restaurants and other public places. He could use the comedy club he owns upstairs; having a cannabis and comedy night. Or maybe the yoga studio he owns; in a pot-inspired practice.

“This has been the missing ingredient,” Landes said. “You have people coming to Denver to enjoy legal pot, and they have had no place to use it.”

Things quickly changed on Friday following a ruling by state licensing authorities stating bars and restaurants with liquor licenses could not allow pot use on the premises. As per The Colorado Department of Revenue; this decision was made last summer following talks with: the liquor industry, health experts and groups such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

State officials released a news conference stating that the ruling prohibiting the “use of alcohol and pot” concurrently is in the best interest of public health and safety. Using both substances together greatly increases the risk of motor vehicle accidents as opposed to using one substance alone.

The Colorado Restaurant Assn. agreed, stating cannabis use in bars and restaurants “will dramatically increase the liability risks for these establishments.”

This new law “put the breaks” on what many were celebrating as a big step toward the goal of marijuana normalization in Colorado as well as the nation.

Although the state denies it; advocates of marijuana accused them of openly fighting a battle for the liquor industry. The state says the ruling had nothing to do with the passage of the new marijuana measure. It is very likely that Colorado’s marijuana issues are being closely watched by other states who have legalized cannabis.

Colorado and Washington were the first states to make recreational marijuana legal back in 2012. Since then, The District of Columbia as well as six other states have joined them, including California this month. The newcomers are watching the pioneers to see what does and does not work and how to get around the conflicts with the federal government who continues to classify marijuana as illegal.

Supporters backing Initiative 300; (Denver’s new cannabis law) feel that even though they have encountered road blocks, they have come a long way toward addressing the confusion of legal cannabis vs. finding a place to eat, vape or smoke it.

“You have seen a dramatic rise in arrests in Colorado for public consumption of pot. People are using it in the parks and sidewalks where they shouldn’t,” said Kayvan Khalatbari, co-owner of Denver Relief Consulting, who campaigned in favor of the initiative. “Our hope is that [Initiative 300] will reduce public consumption.”

“They seem to think it’s fine for patrons of bars and concert venues to get blackout drunk, but unacceptable for them to use a far less harmful substance like marijuana instead,” said Mason Tvert, spokesman for the National Marijuana Policy Project. “This rule will not prevent bar-goers from consuming marijuana, but it will ensure that they consume it outside in the alley or on the street rather than inside of a private establishment.”

0 1506

California voters passed the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, also identified as Proposition 64, making it legal to smoke marijuana recreationally in the state. Californians are currently allowed to grow and possess pot, but Los Angeles Times reports they won’t be able to purchase it legally until dispensaries are properly licensed. The state has until January 1st, 2018 to begin issuing licenses.The Times estimates it may take up to a year for lawmakers to set up the rules necessary to regulate the marijuana industry.

RELATED Govt: Marijuana Still as Dangerous as Heroin, Ecstasy U.S. government refuses to reclassify marijuana from Schedule I list, though restrictions on where pot can be grown for medical research will be loosened The newly passed proposition allows adults 21 and older to use marijuana however they’d like in their own homes and in licensed businesses, according to Ballotpedia.

Citizens may possess up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and grow up to six plants at their private home, as long as they’re locked and not visible to the public. It also allows the state to tax the cultivation and sale of marijuana; cities and counties may also impose their own taxes.

Revenue from the taxes will go to drug research, youth programs and other community resources related to regulating the marijuana industry.
Much like laws regulating alcohol, it is still illegal for Californians to drive under the influence of marijuana. Users may also not smoke in public places or wherever smoking tobacco is illegal.

If people under the age of 18 are found to be using marijuana, they will have to attend drug education and counseling programs and perform community service. People who sell pot without a license face up to six months in jail and up to a $500 fine.

People who smoke weed in public face up to a $100 fine, and people who are caught smoking in public places or near a school face up to a $250 fine. People currently serving time for weed-related offenses covered under the law are now eligible for re-sentencing. Medical marijuana has been legal in California since 1996, though it is still illegal at the federal level.

0 918

While many people are excited to be given the chance to vote on the recreational use of marijuana, many advocates fear legalizing the drug for recreational use will cause patients to opt for cheaper weed.
The medical marijuana industry is troubled over what will happen to the market competition if these ballots are passed. The states that are fighting for this cause in this election, already have established and thriving medical marijuana industries.

Medical growers fear that if corporations are allowed into the business, the corporations’ profit motives will uproot medical grower’s efforts to treat patients with the drug, reports The Denver Post.The people who are supporting the broadening legalization are arguing that medical vendors are dismayed that they are losing their monopoly of the industry. The supporters believe the ballots will benefit medical patients.

“When it’s legal we’re going to see an increase in quality and a decrease in cost, and that is really good for people who need access to this medicine,” Carey Clark, a board member of the American Cannabis Nurses Association, told The Denver Post. “Things will be labeled and they’ll know what they’re getting.”

California, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada are the five states who are putting recreational marijuana legalization on the ballot this November. An additional four states will be voting on medical marijuana. Gallup displayed a recent poll that shows that 60 percent of Americans favor legalization, which is the highest support the issue has registered in nearly 50 years.

However, supporters of recreational legalization and those who want to protect the medical industry are not so happy with one another and the friction from the competition is growing. Doctors who treat patients with medical marijuana fear patients will bypass their doctor and the doctor’s recommendations, and purchase the medical marijuana themselves.

“This is being structured for big corporations to come in and in a very short period of time wipe out the caregivers,” Lori Libbey, a nurse who administers medical marijuana, told The Denver Post. “I wonder who is going to be able to provide for pediatric patients.”

Activists are optimistic for a push towards national legalization and the record national support is the leading cause of this hope.

Subscribe Now & Begin Receiving Marijuana Stocks News, Articles, Trade Alerts & MORE, all 100% FREE!

We are your #1 source for all things Marijuana Stocks, Subscribe Below!

Privacy Policy: We will NEVER share, sell, barter, etc. any of our subscribers information for any reason ever! By subscribing you agree we can send you via email our free e-newsletter on marijuana stocks related, articles, news and trade alerts. Further questions please contact privacy@marijuanastocks.com
Ad Placements