Tags Posts tagged with "Hemp seeds"

Hemp seeds

0 825

There’s one piece of legislation that seems to be getting a widespread of bipartisan support in Springfield.The Illinois Senate earlier this month collectively gave the green light to a bill that would allow farmers to cultivate and sell industrial hemp, a strain of cannabis. Yet unlike marijuana, industrial hemp contains less than one percent of THC, and its fiber can be used to manufacture a variety of products.

Peoria-based company Global Hemp is developing potential uses for hemp fiber, which can be chemically processed or “cottonized,” to produce a softer material.

“I want this to be that someone goes to Banana Republic, like this shirt I have on, and says, ‘wow, this is hemp? I would have thought this is cotton,’” Global Hemp President Eric Pollitt said, tugging at his plaid sleeve.

Global Hemp is also developing and researching hemp-based materials, like particle board and plastic alternatives, to be used for construction. Pollitt says a car company has already expressed interest in using his product for building prototypes.

“But they can’t say, ‘yeah, sure we’ll go ahead and make next year’s car model with hemp in it, and you guys go ahead and start growing it,’” Pollitt said. “The supply has to be there first. The demand is already there.”

Pollitt says he estimates Illinois stands to gain an economic industry, including processing and transportation, that could outpace the state’s pumpkin crop. The Industrial Hemp Bill now heads to the House.

The legislation would amend the Illinois Noxious Weed Law to allow farmers to grow hemp to be processed and sold for its fiber, seeds and oil. Hemp supporters point to neighboring Kentucky, where more than 135 farms and 40 processors have enrolled in the state’s pilot program that launched in 2016.

0 1377

University of Minnesota students may do double-takes this summer if they spot what looks like marijuana plants growing on the agricultural testing fields at the St. Paul campus. However, the dark green foliage with jagged leaves will actually be industrial hemp, a close look-alike and cousin to marijuana that’s useless for getting high but potentially valuable for certain foods, cosmetics, and oil.

There will be signs posted to indicate that the plants are a hemp experiment and not a drug. The industrial hemp is part of a pilot program regulated by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture that’s now beginning its second year and has generated surprising interest. Last year, seven producers planted about 37 acres of the crop in the state. In 2017, 42 growers will be planting more than 2,100 acres in 26 counties.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture assistant commissioner, Andrea Vaubel, attributes some of the interest to greater public and farmer realization that industrial hemp is a legitimate crop, and that it’s different from medical hemp or cannabis. Industrial hemp is the same plant, she said, but its delta-9 THC level (which gives marijuana its kick) is less than 0.3%. “You’d have to smoke a whole field of it, and all you’d get is a headache,” she said.

Though industrial hemp has no value as a drug, it is still considered a Schedule 1 narcotic under the federal Controlled Substances Act and has been illegal to grow since the 1940s. However, the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to begin pilot programs to raise industrial hemp as long as they had corresponding laws to regulate it. About half of the states have done so or are moving in that direction.

Studying the growth, cultivation, and marketing of industrial hemp is the goal of the state’s pilot program, Vaubel said. “We really want to understand if this is a viable crop for Minnesota, and are there markets out there for farmers to capitalize on,” she said. “So far we think there are.” Because of federal restrictions, Minnesota producers ordering industrial hemp seeds must have them delivered to the state agriculture department, which inspects and tests them. The growers also need to apply for state permits, pass criminal background checks, and agree to various other conditions during the season and after the hemp is harvested.

University of Minnesota students may do double-takes this summer if they spot what looks like marijuana plants growing on the agricultural testing fields at the St. Paul campus. However, the dark green foliage with jagged leaves will actually be industrial hemp, a close look-alike and cousin to marijuana that’s useless for getting high but potentially valuable for certain foods, cosmetics, and oil.

There will be signs posted to indicate that the plants are a hemp experiment and not a drug. The industrial hemp is part of a pilot program regulated by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture that’s now beginning its second year and has generated surprising interest. Last year, seven producers planted about 37 acres of the crop in the state. In 2017, 42 growers will be planting more than 2,100 acres in 26 counties.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture assistant commissioner, Andrea Vaubel, attributes some of the interest to greater public and farmer realization that industrial hemp is a legitimate crop, and that it’s different from medical hemp or cannabis. Industrial hemp is the same plant, she said, but its delta-9 THC level (which gives marijuana its kick) is less than 0.3%. “You’d have to smoke a whole field of it, and all you’d get is a headache,” she said.

Though industrial hemp has no value as a drug, it is still considered a Schedule 1 narcotic under the federal Controlled Substances Act and has been illegal to grow since the 1940s. However, the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to begin pilot programs to raise industrial hemp as long as they had corresponding laws to regulate it. About half of the states have done so or are moving in that direction.

Studying the growth, cultivation, and marketing of industrial hemp is the goal of the state’s pilot program, Vaubel said. “We really want to understand if this is a viable crop for Minnesota, and are there markets out there for farmers to capitalize on,” she said. “So far we think there are.” Because of federal restrictions, Minnesota producers ordering industrial hemp seeds must have them delivered to the state agriculture department, which inspects and tests them. The growers also need to apply for state permits, pass criminal background checks, and agree to various other conditions during the season and after the hemp is harvested.

0 1510
Hemp

In a milestone that signifies growth for its hemp market; Colorado becomes the first state in the nation to make certified seeds for industrial hemp. As per federal law, a pot plant must contain 0.3 percent or less Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), to be classified as hemp. THC is the determining factor that classifies a pot plant as hemp or marijuana. Textiles, paper, plastics, solar panels and biofuel can be made from hemp. Hemp seeds can be utilized to process a wide variety of food products such as: bread and milk. It can also be used as livestock feed.

Marijuana derived CBD is only legal in states which have legalized medical marijuana; however, hemp derived CBD is legal in all 50 states. According to CBD advocates, CBD oil is safe for children and has been praised as a treatment for a variety of diseases and disorders. As per Duane Sinning, assistant director for plant industry at the Colorado Department of Agriculture; approximately 30 states allow some type of hemp production, but none of them have certified seed. Certification signifies the seed was tested in all growing conditions possible statewide and the plants met the 0.3 percent or less THC maximum.

Approximately 260 growers in Colorado are cultivating hemp in 400 locations per Sinning. During the first year there was 200 acres planted with another 250,000 square feet of indoor hemp growing. In 2016 there is currently 6,000 acres planted as well as 1.3 million square feet of indoor cultivation. As per Sinning, it is important to have certified seed because if you buy uncertified seed you do not know until after it grows, whether or not it will pass that crucial 0.3 percent test. If you exceed 0.3 percent; it is no longer considered hemp, under federal law it is marijuana.

0 2772

For over 12,000 years, hemp has been used as a crop in many civilizations around the globe. Hemp was one of the first crops to ever be spun into fiber. It has an amazing amount of functionalities; from paper to food to clothing. Hemp is also environmentally friendlier than wheat and cotton. Beginning in the late 1600s, hemp was a vital cash crop in the United States. George Washington farmed hemp to produce rope and canvas.

Hemp seed has a THC level below 0.3 percent which is not enough to get anyone high. The U.S. banned industrial hemp production in the beginning of the 20th century. This followed federal laws that passed banning all kinds of marijuana. Even though hemp had a rocky history and has an uncertain future; it has the potential to generate growth in the US economy and create jobs for American farmers.

Hemp farming was originally banned in the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. This law enforced a tax on the sale of all forms of marijuana; therefore, it became economically impossible to produce. As a result the hemp industry faded away. Hemp was grouped with marijuana again in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970; this time declaring it a Schedule I drug despite the fact it is not potent enough to make anyone high. Even though it became legal to import fully manufactured hemp in 1998, it was still illegal for hemp to be cultivated at all on US soil. Later the 2014 Farm Bill included an amendment permitting research on industrial hemp production by states that passed legislation to legalize hemp farming.

Because of this new law, universities, agriculture departments and licensed farmers in 20 states were able to begin pilot programs and conduct research. Scientists are watched closely by the government and DEA to make sure that the hemp grown has THC levels that are in compliance with federal standards. Despite this, the DEA still does not allow licensed researchers to import hemp seed. Therefore, it could be months before they can put the seed in the ground and start their research.

The hemp industry has still managed to achieve success despite all the obstacles it has faced. Hemp products in the U.S. are valued at $581 million and these numbers continue to grow. Because of its economic potential, there is widespread bipartisan agreement that hemp farming could net large gains for the agricultural and manufacturing industries in the U.S. Hemp has many functions. It is able to be used in a wide array of products manufactured or sold in the U.S. such as: natural soaps, clothing and even cars. It is also a good source of fiber and is found in brands such as: Hempzels, Living Harvest and Nutiva. None of these manufacturers buy their hemp domestically because it is not available. Manufacturers and American farmers would both benefit if it were available domestically and it would probably be cheaper than importing it.

More companies might consider using hemp in their products if locally sourced hemp was available. Since legalizing the commercial production of industrial hemp in 1998, Canada has seen an increase in small businesses finding new ways to use and market hemp products – and most of these businesses have experienced growth. Food products especially have high potential in the US market: Manitoba Harvest, a Canadian hemp-based food company, reported 500 percent growth in sales over the past five years with about half of the sales coming from US consumers.

The legalization of industrial hemp could also seriously help American farmers: hemp seed is valued at anywhere from $477 – $900 per acre, compared to wheat, which is valued at $485 per acre. Support for this issue by organizations of local farmers has lead to bipartisan support in Congress: Senate Republicans Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul represent two of industrial hemp’s biggest supporters, largely because they believe in this industry’s potential to create jobs for their constituents in Kentucky, where the soil and landscape is a good fit for the crop. Paul argues that the new industry could help replace unproductive land that was previously used for tobacco farming and coal mining.

0 1185
Hemp

Among the many crops grown on Glenn Rodes’ family farm in Rockingham County this summer was one that has not been cultivated in Virginia for decades but that may have a chance at a comeback now, thanks to a slow shift in attitudes and the law. Hidden behind rows of corn in one field, Rodes grew a small crop of hemp – a hardy, fiber-rich plant that can grow 8 feet tall and which has been used for thousands of years to make textiles, rope, paper, animal feed and food products.

In September, Rodes’ farm was part of Virginia’s first hemp harvest in over 10 years. Hemp supporters say the plant does not deserve that opprobrium. Having been bred over many generations for its industrial uses, hemp has vastly lower concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive compound that makes marijuana a recreational drug.

The hemp grown on his farm was used to make biodiesel to run farm equipment. In the 2014 farm bill, Congress allowed state departments of agriculture to license the growing of industrial hemp for research purposes. With the change in federal law, 30 states, including Virginia, then passed legislation authorizing their own hemp research programs.

In 2016, the General Assembly passed another set of bills allowing for the commercial production of hemp, but federal law would have to be relaxed further for that to happen. Two bills are pending in Congress that would exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marijuana if it has a THC concentration of less than 0.3 percent – far less than the concentration in marijuana, which can be from 5 to 20 percent.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services imported 16 varieties of hemp seed and issued licenses to 29 people to grow hemp this year as part of the research programs.

“We typically look at hemp as a plant that can produce very durable and very strong fiber for its weight,” Fike said.

If commercial production is allowed, it also is uncertain just how large the market could be for Virginia-grown hemp or how much income it might generate for farmers. Advocates say the market could be sizable, given hemp’s usefulness in many products. The Hemp Industries Association, a national advocacy group for hemp production, estimated the value of hemp products sold at retail in the U.S. at $573 million in 2015.

“We literally have millions of cars on the road that have hemp parts in them,” said Eric Steenstra, executive director of the association.

Yost admitted he was skeptical when he first was approached about carrying legislation to allow for hemp research in Virginia.

Yost said he now sees hemp as a potential job-creation catalyst in regions of the state hurt by the loss of tobacco and manufacturing jobs.

For advocates such as Amatucci of the Virginia Industrial Hemp Coalition, the research that is happening now is good, but the move toward eventual commercialization is not happening quickly enough.

The amount of hemp cultivated in 2016 in the various research programs across the U.S. was close to 10,000 acres, or double the amount grown in 2015.

” Rodes, the Rockingham farmer, said he sees hemp as a potentially lucrative cash crop.

0 3134

Hemp production in the United States is finally becoming relevant again. After the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to grow hemp legally for research purposes, Kentucky implemented a pilot program. Ryan Quarles, Kentucky’s agricultural commissioner told Kentucky Public Radio. “In the first year, about 30 acres were planted. In the second year, about 900. This year, over 2,000. And we fully expect there to be substantial growth in 2017,”.

Kentucky state Department of Agriculture will be accepting applications for the Pilot Program until November 14th, and they must be submitted with a $350 application fee, per grower address. Other fees involved in participating in the pilot program include those for producers and private labs, which can range from $400 to $1,000 depending on the size of the facility, along with a $50 nonrefundable application fee.

Kentucky and Colorado are leading the nation in innovation and production of industrial hemp, a product that has been imported for the last 80years. Having to first learn old techniques due to lack of innovation and advanced production materials, the farmers are getting better at producing hemp and learning the best times to plant the crop. With all the different uses for hemp – hundreds, if not thousands – hemp farmers are expected to make a solid return. Kentucky and Colorado are expected to see great growth from the innovation and production of industrial hemp.

0 1292
marijuana-stocks-cannabis-hemp

With marijuana on pace to be legalized in the United States in the next five to ten years, the conversation regarding hemp has begun to stir up. Hemp and marijuana are commonly confused because they both come from the Cannabis Sativa species of plant. Hemp and marijuana were both prescribed as illegal during the Prohibition Era but the Agricultural Act of 2014 known as the Farm Bill, allowed states to study hemp for research purposes and classified industrial hemp as having .3% THC compared to marijuana’s 10-30%. On July 4, a petition will be delivered to Congress urging them to pass the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015/2016.

Hemp can be used to produce many things including textiles, cars, food, homes, and more according to Rob Jungmann who owns Jungmaven, a hemp-loving company. It is also good for environment unlike many other crops including cotton. Hemp puts Nitrogen back into the soil and takes less water while producing more plants per acre. Jungmann alludes to California’s drought as a great reason for hemp to be legalized in the state. Thirty countries allow industrial hemp to be grown, China being its biggest producer and exporter. Unlike any other product, the U.S. requires farmers to get DEA approval before they sew the seeds.

Michael Lewis, the director of Growing Warriors, a project devoted to helping the country’s veterans find livelihoods in sustainable agriculture, spoke of his experience with the DEA in a short film titled Harvesting Liberty. In 2014, the DEA wanted to prevent and arrest Lewis and the other farmers but a Louisville judge sided with the farmers. Growing Warriors was the first group of private citizens to grow hemp on US soil in 70 years.

 

0 1576

Colorado scored another across the nation first Wednesday including cannabis when state agribusiness authorities flaunted the initially affirmed household hemp seeds. The Colorado Department of Agriculture has been working for a considerable length of time to deliver hemp seeds that reliably create plants sufficiently low in the substance THC to qualify as hemp and not its inebriating cousin, weed. The seed confirmation “is vital to the long-term growth of the industry,” stated Duane Sinning of the department that oversees the Colorado’s near 400 hemp growers.

“A farmer, he already takes a lot of risks dropping a seed into the ground, whether you’ll have enough water, all that,” Sinning added. “This crop is even riskier.”

Hemp creation was approved by Congress in 2014. Be that as it may, ranchers who need to develop it must have state affirmation to raise the product. The business appraises that less than 7,000 sections of land of hemp are being developed across the nation this year. Seed shortage is referred to as a noteworthy barrier to the utilization of hemp turning out to be more broad. Seed costs can begin at $25 a pound and go up to more than a dollar for an individual seed.

On the off chance that the seeds produce plants above 0.3 percent THC, they should be decimated, leaving the producer with an aggregate misfortune. Horticultural specialists are fascinated by hemp’s business potential. Past wellbeing nourishments, hemp can be utilized as a part of the generation of fiber or squeezed into oils utilized restoratively. In addition, it is dry spell strong.

“I’m standing in a field right now that is probably 4 to 5 feet, taller than corn … and was watered half as much,” Sinning stated. “It is an excellent-looking crop out here.”

Agriculturists in the 29 states that permit hemp creation in specific situations will have the capacity to purchase the affirmed seeds in 2017. Colorado seed merchants, not the state, will set costs. However Sinning anticipated they might be pricier than imported seeds since they’re ensured.

0 1559

 

In the last hundred years, many natural fibers have been surrogated by synthetics. Synthetic fibers may seem optimal because of their low prices and mass production, but they are produced by petroleum which means that they are non-biodegradable, non-renewable, and end in toxic waste products. Although synthetic fibers are cheap to produce, they have a negative impact to both our environment and our health.

The quickest expanding product of synthetic fibers is polyester, which had a demand of 55.2 million tons in 2014. However, the production and disposal of polyester leads to a concoction of environmental problems. The worst part of it is that petrochemical textiles have had a negative impact on many hard-working American farmers since synthetic fibers are not grown. Instead, they are taken from deep in the Earth which gets rid of the farmer from the process.

On the other side of the spectrum, hemp is renewable, biodegradable, and good for the environment. Hemp fibers contain some of the most durable mechanical properties of all natural fibers. In addition, hemp materials may be used in sundry applications from ropes to fabrics to bottles to building materials. Hemp is even capable of becoming a biofuel in order to power the mills that use it.

As energy extraction technology improves, the supply of hydrocarbons is said to be infinite. Obviously, that is not the case; sometime in the future, oil will become scarce and the world will be forced to turn to natural fibers. In the future when this hypothetical becomes a reality, people will turn away from synthetics and turn to cotton. However, it has been proven that hemp is superior to cotton in strength and other features which are why many hope that hemp will be the plant of the future.

0 460

Last year, a Farm Bill was passed by Congress that allowed for a wide range of federal farm programs. Hidden inside of that legislation was an amendment that allowed states and universities to research hemp, a plant that has been long since banned in the United States.

In 1937, with the Marijuana Tax Act, hemp production was banned in the United States. Now, North Carolina passed a bill that would legalize the production of industrial hemp within the state. Let’s look at eight facts about hemp.

The first and probably the most important is that hemp does not get one high. Hemp only contains 0.3% THC, the psychoactive ingredient that can get one high. Secondly, natives of a tiny island near China may have been the first to farm hemp.

On that island, scientists found pottery made from hemp, while looking through a Stone Age Taiwanese village. Next is that most household items may be made from hemp; the North American Industrial Hemp Council predicts that there are over 25,000 products that may be made from hemp. Fourthly, In the 1600s, property owners in North America were required to grow hemp by law.

Fifthly, both Woody Harrelson and Mitch McConnell may have something in common; they are both proud supporters of hemp that have made valiant efforts to legalize the crop. Sixth, “Hemp for Victory!” That was the slogan advocating hemp legalization to increase revenues during World War II. Seventh, Hemp seeds contain nutrients that are also found in breast milk. Gamma-linolenic acid is found in hemp seeds and may be found in the seed along with sundry other nutrients. Finally, hemp stalks may be used to store energy. Just a year ago, David Mitlin and other scientists made an energy storage device made from leftover hemp according to the BBC.

Subscribe Now & Begin Receiving Marijuana Stocks News, Articles, Trade Alerts & MORE, all 100% FREE!

We are your #1 source for all things Marijuana Stocks, Subscribe Below!

Privacy Policy: We will NEVER share, sell, barter, etc. any of our subscribers information for any reason ever! By subscribing you agree we can send you via email our free e-newsletter on marijuana stocks related, articles, news and trade alerts. Further questions please contact privacy@marijuanastocks.com
Ad Placements