Tags Posts tagged with "Donald Trump"

Donald Trump

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The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws is showing a distinct signal to the cabinet of President Donald Trump after the latest in crackdown laws aimed at legal marijuana in Colorado and other states. This has taken place by Justice Department officials Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein. The NORML policy director Justin Strekal debuted a statement claiming, “Should the Department of Justice decide to throw out the Tenth Amendment and respect for states’ rights as they govern their own intrastate commerce, they’re going to have a fight on their hands.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was scheduled to speak at a U.S. Senate appropriations subcommittee yesterday, June thirteenth, but that appearance never occurred due to his being called before a different body to supposedly answer, but mostly avoid questions about possible collusion with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

Because of the supposed corruption, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appeared in his place. Rosenstein responded to an inquiry about medical marijuana policy from Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski stating, “We do have a conflict between federal law and the law in some states. It’s a difficult issue for parents like me, who have to provide guidance to our kids… I’ve talked to Chuck rosenberg, the administrator of the DEA, and we follow the law and the science. And from a legal and scientific perspective, marijuana is an unlawful drug. It’s properly scheduled under Schedule I, and therefore we have this conflict.”

The choice to schedule marijuana as schedule one is a hot topic, as has been reported multiple times. There are many bills before Congress that aim to change marijuana’s scheduling from schedule I (Implying that it has the same risks as Heroin and Methamphetmine), stating that it has no medicinal benefits, to Schedule II, or Schedule III.

Strekal, who is in favor of de-scheduling the plant, is not at all shocked by Rosenstein’s statements. He has been quoted saying that marijuana should in fact be de-scheduled, and that the laws around it are extremely harsh. He has also stated that it is unfair for the federal government to be involved in the legislation of individual state law.

Although during Trumps 2016 campaign, Trump has positive things to say about medical cannabis, he has since ripped apart recreational cannabis laws. If you have an administration that treats a scientifically proven medicinal plant as though it is a schedule one narcotic with no health benefits, as well as refusing a law that is authored by a branch of the government, it becomes an extremely volatile situation.

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The marijuana sector is one of the quickest growing industry’s in the country — projections for this year could add up to billions of dollars in sales. However with a new administration at the wheel in Washington, D.C., one that is potentially less favorable to legalization, marijuana entrepreneurs and investors alike are dealing with a difficult time.

Startups, analysts, and investors convened this week at the Marijuana Business Daily’s Conference and Expo just outside the nation’s capital in Oxon Hill, Maryland. The issue on everyone’s minds: what the marijuana industry is depicted as under a Trump presidency, as Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Press Secretary Sean Spicer have indicated the possibility for sterner enforcement at the federal level, where marijuana is technically illegal. The Department of Justice did not immediately respond to request for comment.

“I am concerned about what I am hearing, but we’ve been through several administrations at this point, and this is a matter of states’ rights,” stated Christie Lunsford, COO of Pro MAX Grow, which sells LED horticultural lighting for licensed marijuana growers and is based in Tappan, N.Y.

“I think the impact we will see coming out of Washington, D.C., is fewer investors coming into space … fewer people launching businesses direct to the plant — cultivation, dispensing and manufacturing. That’s where you’re going to see people not wanting to enter the cannabis space,” she stated.

To date, the growth of the industry is undeniable, with marijuana legalized for recreational use in eight states and Washington, D.C., and for medicinal use in 30 states and Washington, D.C., per Marijuana Business Daily.

Projections differ among industry critics, yet the numbers are large. Marijuana Business Daily makes a prediction that retail sales will hit $6.1 billion for 2017 and the industry could have a maximum economic impact of close to $68.4 billion by 2021; GreenWave Advisors set there prediction at $7.7 billion for 2017 and $30 billion by 2021 if recreational and medicinal cannabis is legalized through the entire country

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Although the United States legal cannabis train has already left the station, President Donald Trump’s first 100 days have raised some concerns.

The best way to describe his first 100 days is something like a rocket fueled roller coaster and we want to highlight the top 5 developments that have transpired thus far.

• West Virginia became the 29th state to legalize medical cannabis after Governor Jim Justice signed legislation to create a legal program in the state. The program will allow patients suffering with terminal illnesses or any of 14 specified conditions access to cannabis.
• Jeff Sessions has been shut down once again as the budget bill that passed to prevent a government shutdown contained a provision known as the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment, which has United States cannabis business owners breathing a sigh of relief. The provision will make sure that no portion of Department of Justice’s budget will be allowed to be used to attempt to fight state laws allowing for the use of medical marijuana.
• After Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper met with Attorney General Jeff Sessions he does not expect there to be a federal crackdown on legal cannabis. Governor Hickenlooper said Sessions called the Obama administration’s guidance on marijuana not too far from good policy.
• Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly called marijuana a potentially dangerous gateway drug that frequently leads to the use of harder drugs the day after he said that cannabis is not a factor in the United States’ current fight against narcotics.
• In February, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer attempted to link cannabis use to the opioid addiction crisis plaguing the United States. He said the President understands the value of medical cannabis for those in need, but recreational cannabis is an issue for the Department of Justice to provide further clarification.

Authored By: Michael Berger

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As Donald trump continues to demand federal funding for the border wall, he has leaned heavily on the argument that the wall will be an attempt to battle the countries war on drugs with Mexico.

“The Wall is a very important tool in stopping drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth (and many others)!” the president tweeted this week “If the wall is not built, which it will be, the drug situation will NEVER be fixed the way it should be!”

Experts on drug trade think a border wall, even one as grandiose and non-existent as the one trump promised, would be very ineffective in stopping the cross-border supply of illegal drugs.

The main reason? Drugs that come in to the country from the border go through existing border checkpoints by car or truck. Those checkpoints will still be there regardless if the wall gets built or not.

Drug cartels “transport the bulk of their drugs over the Southwest border through ports of entry (POEs) using passenger vehicles or tractor trailers,” the DEA wrote in its its 2015 national drug threat assessment. “The drugs are typically secreted in hidden compartments when transported in passenger vehicles or comingled with legitimate goods when transported in tractor trailers.”

No matter how high the wall is, those ports of entry will remain, as they are the doors that the drugs have already been seeping through. The image of a drug smuggler running across the border is almost fictional, according to drug policy experts

“Smuggling drugs in cars is far easier than carrying them on the backs of people through a really harsh desert terrain,” stated Vanda Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings institution “The higher the fence will be, the more will go through ports of entry”

The trump administration already knows this, Department of homeland security secretary John F. Kelly recognized the fact that illicit drugs “mostly come through the ports of entry.” At a separate meeting in February, the director of a customs border task force told lawmakers that “the southwest land border POEs are the major points of entry for illegal drugs, where smugglers use a wide variety of tactics and techniques for concealing drugs.”

A smart border drug policy is one that would improve the points of entry rather than the wall between the countries. According to Adam Isaacson, senior associate for defense oversight at the Washington office, the nations ports of entry would require about 5 billion dollars in improvements, not limited to the personnel and the technology used to screen cars and people coming into the country.

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Oregon state legislators who fear elevated marijuana enforcement by federal agents recently approved a bill to protect marijuana users from having their identities or buying habits from being divulged by the shops that make buying pre-rolled joints and “magic” brownies as easy as grabbing a bottle of whiskey from the liquor store.

The bipartisan bill would protect marijuana consumers by abolishing a common business practice in this Pacific Northwest state where marijuana shops often keep a digital paper trail of their recreational pot customers’ names, birthdates, addresses, and other personal information. The data is gleaned from their driver’s licenses, passports, or whatever other form of ID they present at the door to prove they’re at least 21 as required by law.

The data is often collected without customers’ consent or knowledge. It is stored away as proprietary information the businesses use mostly for marketing and customer service purposes, such as linking their driver’s license number with every pot product they buy so dispensary employees are better able to help out during their next visit.

The measure that passed 53-5 now heads to Democratic Governor Kate Brown, who is expected to sign it into law. It would bring Oregon statutes in line with similar laws already in place in Alaska and Colorado and self-imposed industry standards in Washington state. The only other three U.S. states were where recreational marijuana is actively sold in shops to consumers of legal age. State Representative Carl Wilson, a Republican who helped sponsor the bill said, “Given the immediate privacy issues, this is a good bill protecting the privacy of Oregonians choosing to purchase marijuana.”

Upon the proposal signing into law, Oregon marijuana retailers would have 30 days to destroy their customers’ data from their databases and would be banned from such record-keeping in the future. Recreational marijuana buyers could still choose, however, to sign up for dispensary email lists to get promotional coupons or birthday discounts. The bill’s provisions do not apply to medical marijuana patients.

Oregon’s move was one of the first major responses to mixed signals about President Donald Trump administration’s stance on the federal prohibition on marijuana, which is legal for recreational use in eight states plus Washington, D.C., and legal for medical purposes in more than half the country.

Worries began in late February when White House spokesman Sean Spicer first signaled a restriction may loom on recreational marijuana. A few weeks later, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said medical cannabis has been “hyped, maybe too much” and is “only slightly less awful” than heroin. Trump, however, has previously suggested the marijuana issue should be up to the states.

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“Wait did I read that correctly?” you’re probably asking yourself, right? Mr. Sessions has seemingly been the thorn in the side of the legal marijuana movement and he’s been a topic of great debate for days now. But there may be some shining light ahead to put a bit more ease to those looking at this industry and in their favor. Yes, worries about this “great shift” in federal enforcement in states where recreational legalization has been granted may be able to breathe a little easier right now.

There’s been an immense amount of angst and paranoia with regard to what some have understood as a government crackdown on recreational use. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has had private discussions with a few Republican senators saying that he doesn’t plan to stray away from the Obama-placed policy of granting states the ability to enact their own marijuana laws for their residents.

Sessions has been a strong force to be reckoned with after he ordered a review of the “hands-off” policy that President Barack Obama previously had. But apparently Mr. Sessions has had a bit of a change of heart and in private conversations, has assured senators before he was confirmed that he didn’t have too much consideration about drastically changing the enforcement laws; even though he’s not a fan of the drug’s use.

Here are a few quotes from these informed senators:

“Nothing at this point has changed,” said Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.)

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things. And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not the [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

-Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky)

“We respectfully request that you uphold DOJ’s existing policy regarding states that have implemented strong and effective regulations for recreational use. It is critical that states continue to implement these laws.”

-Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) & Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska)

“Do they really respect states’ rights? Then you should respect all of them, not just pick and choose the ones that you want to support or not. Many states have gone not only the path of Nevada of recreational marijuana but medical marijuana. How can you pick or choose one or another?”

-Sen Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada)

A group of bipartisan senators also had submitted a letter on Thursday that pushed for Sessions to keep the Obama-era policy intact in order to let states decide on how to implement recreational marijuana laws. Sen. Warren and Sen. Murkowski lead the effort; both of who are from states who’s already put legalized marijuana laws in place.

To date, 8 states and Washington, D.C. have laws in place that legalize marijuana for recreational use. Most senators who signed on the letter are from those states with Murkowski being the only Republican. The others include:

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington
Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon
Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon
Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington
Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts
Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii
Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada
Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey
Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado

The concern isn’t just among senators from those states but is an issue among many conservatives who are nervous about the GOP being selective about allowing the rights of states to supersede federal law.

“We’re concerned about some of the language that we’re hearing. And I think that conservatives who are for states’ rights ought to believe in states’ rights. I’m going to continue to advocate that the states should be left alone,” Paul said.

Sen. Gardner was even more direct with the opinion on Sessions’ comments, “He was talking about if there’s cartels involved in illegal operations, they’re going to crack down on that. That’s what everybody’s saying. I still haven’t heard Jeff Sessions say that. We obviously want to make sure we’re clear on what they’ve said.”

Despite the shake-up that Sessions almost single-handedly ignited with his comments about “not being a fan of expanded use of marijuana,” or how despite him being open to states passing laws that they choose, he made it a point to say, “it does remain a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not,” senators like Murkowski seem unshaken. In fact Murkowski said that she wasn’t alarmed and is simply monitoring the DOJ closely, “It’s probably a little premature to try to predict what may or may not be coming out of the administration on this, so I think we just need to sit back and see.”

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One of the decisions President Donald Trump will have to make is whether to move forward with the federal government’s hands off policy on cannabis, which has allowed the sale of the substance in 27 states. President Trump’s nominee for attorney general, Senator Jeff Sessions, has signaled that the new administration could end the practice of allowing states to legalize marijuana. Sessions stated, “It’s not so much the attorney general’s job to decide what laws to enforce. We should do our job and enforce laws as effectively as we’re able.”

Paul Callan and Danny Cevallos, from CNN, were asked for their views on the subject.

1. Cannabis is illegal under federal law. It’s a Schedule 1 controlled substance. Does the President have an obligation to enforce the law as written until the law is repealed?
Danny Cevallos: Yes. As a criminal defense attorney you might think I’d be anti-enforcement instead of pro-enforcement. But there’s no question that the President and the Attorney General are charged with enforcing the law. Arbitrary or selective enforcement of existing law is itself an abuse of power. The Equal Protection Clause already prohibits the “selective enforcement” of a law based on standards like race or religion. The broad discretion of the executive branch or a prosecutor to charge identical defendants with different crimes creates a real threat of unequal, and unconstitutional, treatment. If you want to legalize marijuana, the solution for the federal government is not to be willfully blind to existing federal law. That sends a bad message. The solution is to be proactive: get rid of the outdated federal law.

Paul Callan: No. Sure, Danny is correct that the President and the Attorney General are supposed to enforce the laws as written, but there is also an important concept called prosecutorial discretion. The government has limited resources and can choose to focus on terrorists, kidnappers, murderers and big-time white collar criminals rather than pot smokers listening to Daft Punk’s latest rendition of “Human After All.” The statute books are filled with laws that are not being enforced because they are obsolete and legislators haven’t gotten around to repealing them. There are an abundance of such laws listed in numerous internet sites. But more serious examples are closer at hand. For example, in 2013 the Justice Department issued a memo from Deputy Attorney General James Cole outlining a limited enforcement policy of only prosecuting federal marijuana criminal violations in cases of violence, interstate smuggling, distribution to minors and in matters of adverse impact on public health. Attorney General nominee Sessions would be wise to follow the Obama approach here, and President Trump should understand that there are a lot of electoral votes in those weed-legal states. And as for my friend Danny Cevallos; it is time for him to face reality and, as they say in Colorado, “chill.”

2. President Obama has excused thousands of drug offenders serving substantial amounts of time in prison for the sale and possession marijuana. Should President Trump continue with the Obama pardon policy given the number of states which have now legalized the drug?

Callan: Yes. President Trump would be wise to follow the example of his predecessor by making use of the pardon and commutation power, with care and discretion. The prisons are filled with inmates who have been sentenced to lengthy prison sentences for drug-related crimes. Many have gotten old in prison and no longer pose a threat to society. Many were unjustly convicted. We have seen a massive increase in costly, wrongful conviction lawsuits throughout the nation. Members of America’s minority communities have been aggrieved by what they perceive as the mass incarceration of their young men due to unjust drug laws that are no longer relevant in modern America. The pardons and commutations should be carefully monitored to make sure violent criminals are not slipping through the cracks but President Trump should follow President Obama’s example in continuing this policy.

Cevallos: No. Does anyone else think it’s a huge waste of resources for President Obama to pardon federal drug offenders instead of getting rid of the federal law that made many of them federal drug offenders in the first place? Think of the resources frittered away: existing federal law is what causes investigations, arrests, trials, appeals, and incarceration. Then, ultimately the same branch of government that spent all that time and money convicting the person grants a pardon or commutation, effectively canceling out all those resources spent getting the conviction. Wouldn’t it be a lot less expensive to get rid of the federal law that led to the expensive investigation, arrest, trial, appeal, and incarceration in the first place? President Obama’s pardon policy for drug offenders is a good thing, but it’s largely cosmetic, and it only conceals the bruises that the federal government itself continues to inflict upon the citizenry. Paul Callan wants to paint himself as a freedom fighter here, and he’s right that the pardon power is good for freeing those for acts no longer considered crimes. But true freedom isn’t pardoning the crime after the person has been incarcerated. It’s getting rid of the crime itself.

3. Republicans have commonly supported the doctrine of federalism. Should President Trump’s Republican Administration allow the states to experiment with cannabis legalization under the doctrine of federalism?
Cevallos: No. As Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis put it: “it is one of the happy incidents of the federal system that a single courageous State may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” I agree completely with that general sentiment. But marijuana is different. States legalizing pot is “experimenting” with something that is flat-out illegal under federal law. When the threat of federal prosecution hangs over a marijuana shop owner or user, states cannot truly serve as laboratories. It’s hard to experiment when banks, investors, insurance companies, and even attorneys are reluctant to provide necessary services, for fear of federal criminal penalties or professional discipline. Paul Callan may cheer states for their open flouting of federal law, but would he represent a shop owner if he thought the bar association’s disciplinary committee would come after him? Heck no. He’s as afraid of the ethics board as I am. And so are plenty of other lawyers, who fear potential disciplinary action for counseling a client to engage in the business of violating federal law. Everyone loves the idea of civil disobedience, until it’s their turn to actually get hit with the fire hose or the police truncheon.
Callan: Yes. There is a lot of truth in a statement often heard in conservative gatherings: “The states created the federal government and not the other way around.” The Constitution was drafted by founding fathers deeply sensitive to the concept of a limited federal government with a vibrant democracy flourishing at the local level. Nowhere is the leadership of the states more clearly demonstrated than in the approval of recreational and medical marijuana in 27 states at last count. This state laboratory creates a superb opportunity to test different approaches to legalization rather than rely on the alleged wisdom of Cevallos’ elite pals in DC, many of whom have just been unceremoniously kicked out of office in the tumultuous election of 2016. Local authorities will ensure that rather than a “one size fits all” federal approach, the best state ideas will be imitated and implemented by other states. And as for the Cevallos claim that lawyers will never represent weed store owners for fear of an ethics prosecution, the Colorado Supreme Court has just given the weed lawyers the green light to represent marijuana businesses. Perhaps Danny Cevallos should consider opening a Denver office.

4. Should cannabis be legalized because taxing it will lead to a rich source of government revenue?
Cevallos: No. Don’t get me wrong. I think ending federal marijuana prohibition is a good idea. I also hope that taxing the drug will be a good source of revenue for states and the federal government. Paul Callan knows that this is a popular argument. But when you think about it, taxing vices hasn’t always been the cure for all ills. Gambling has been legal and taxed for years in places like Atlantic City, where it is the town’s primary industry. Has anyone strolled down that town’s main drag lately? It’s hardly a monument to American prosperity. Speaking of gambling, how about the lottery? State-sponsored gambling is heavily taxed and supposedly goes to help senior citizens and schools. But, would Paul Callan honestly say that the net effect of the lottery on society has been a good one? Hopefully marijuana taxation will be different. Early reports are positive: marijuana generates a lot of tax revenue in the legalized states. But there’s good reason to remain skeptical.
Callan: Yes, Danny raises a legitimate point that taxing vices often fails to raise the large amounts of revenue promised. Things like the lottery seem to generate more money for state bureaucracies than for education. Although Atlantic City looks grim, the gambling vice tax is thriving in Las Vegas, Indian Reservations around the country and even in Bethlehem, PA in Danny’s home state. The lesson is that you must carefully pick the vice you seek to tax. Given the track record to date marijuana seems a winner on the tax revenue side. In Colorado and Oregon, recreational use has spawned a $7.1 billion tax-generating industry. And for vice comparison purposes, the taxing of alcohol has proven to be quite lucrative to the states. Alcohol taxes yielded over $9 billion in revenues in 2015 with projections of $10.18 billion by 2021. As a drug which is arguably far less dangerous, marijuana is likely to generate an even greater revenue stream. The states are finding it difficult to overlook such a revenue stream given the thriving underground economy where only illegal producers and dealers enjoy the profit. If Mr. Trump really does want to lower corporate and personal income taxes, legalized, taxed marijuana may be of assistance in achieving that goal.

5. Many argue that cannabis is no more dangerous than alcohol, yet it’s illegal under the laws of many states and the federal government. Is it fair to treat the substances differently under law?

Callan: No. Wisely, Cevallos will not even fight me on this one. Marijuana is far less dangerous than alcohol and there is a great hypocrisy in permitting legal sales of the older generation’s vice, alcohol, while locking up younger Americans who partake of the far less dangerous marijuana. Of course it must be conceded that the drug is not without serious risks, particularly for those with a propensity toward drug abuse. This is yet another reason to allow experimentation on a state level to see how legalization works out in the real world. As for the Cevallos argument that a teetotaling POTUS will resist legalization, there are more than a few reasons to suggest otherwise. He has previously indicated support for medical marijuana stating: “In terms of marijuana and legalization, I think that should be a state issue, state-by-state. Marijuana is such a big thing. I think medical should happen, right? Don’t we agree? I think so. And then I really believe we should leave it up to the states.” Washington Post, October 29, 2015 And let’s face it, most liberals and progressives would have to be under the influence of drugs to support him, so there may be new Trump supporters if legalization succeeds. Though, let’s hope the new president maintains his teetotaling ways as heaven help us all if POTUS starts smoking “Trump Weed” before preparing his next 3 a.m. tweet.
Cevallos: No. Paul Callan has me here. Prohibiting marijuana and allowing alcohol makes zero sense. But then again, nothing about vice crimes is “fair” or even “logical.” In fact, alcohol is much more dangerous than marijuana. Not only is it bad for your body, it’s a major contributor to accidents, and violence. But the real question is: could Mr. Callan convince Mr. President? Our new POTUS is a self-described teetotaler, a nondrinker and non-drug user. And he’s not the kind who stopped drinking because he used to have a problem, who hit a Bukowski-like bottom and turned his life around in AA. Trump is the kind who says he has never had a sip of alcohol in his life. Those people are intense. They usually like order and control. It’s easy to imagine Trump might be intolerant of vices like marijuana. Then again, he’s been socially liberal in many ways too. It’s hard to predict where his administration will come down on the marijuana industry.

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Recently Jeff Sessions held his confirmation hearing, during which he was asked various types of questions from Senators. Some of those questions specifically dealt with the subject of marijuana. The nomination of Jeff Sessions for United States Attorney General has caused a great amount of risk in the marijuana world, both in America and overseas. President Donald Trump has made remarks in the past that he supports reform, but has also made comments contradicting what he previously said.

If you are an ‘actions speak louder than words’ person like me, then the nomination of Jeff Sessions likely scares you to your core. Jeff Sessions gave answers to the marijuana-related questions from his confirmation hearing. Those answers were neatly compiled and included in today’s ‘Tom Angell Report. The Tom Angell Report is jam packed with all types of marijuana information, whether it be local, state, national, or international news.

  • “While I am generally familiar with the Cole memorandum, I am not privy to any internal Department of Justice data regarding the effectiveness and value of the policies contained within that memorandum. I will certainly review and evaluate those policies, including the original justifications for the memorandum, as well as any relevant data and how circumstances may have changed or how they may change in the future.”

    “I will not commit to never enforcing Federal law. Whether an arrest and investigation of an individual who may be violating the law is appropriate is a determination made in individual cases based on the sometimes unique circumstances surrounding those cases, as well as the resources available at the time.”

    A new federal court ruling that a Congressional rider prevents the Justice Department from going after people complying with state medical marijuana laws “is relatively recent, and I am not familiar with how other courts may have interpreted the relevant appropriations language or the Ninth Circuit’s opinion. As an emerging issue, that is one that will need to be closely evaluated in light of all relevant law and facts. I will conduct such a review. Of course, medical marijuana use is a small part of the growing commercial marijuana industry.”

    Regarding “good people don’t smoke marijuana,” “My words have been grossly mischaracterized and taken out of context. I was discussing the value of treating people for using dangerous and illegal drugs like marijuana, and the context in which treatment is successful.”

    “I echo Attorney General Lynch’s comments [on marijuana being illegal], and commit, as she did, to enforcing federal law with respect to marijuana, although the exact balance of enforcement priorities is an ever-changing determination based on the circumstances and the resources available at the time.”

    “I will defer to the American Medical Association and the researchers at the National Institutes of Health and elsewhere about the medical effects of marijuana. Without having studied the relevant regulations in depth, I cannot say whether they may need to be eased in order to advance research; but, I will review this.”

    The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to recognize Sessions’ nomination but Democrats have hinted they will try to set back the vote.

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“America first” floated into a cloud of marijuana smoke.

A marijuana-themed protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration went off as planned this past Friday, with over thousands of cannabis joints passed out to the people and at least several hundred smoked four minutes into Trump’s first address as the nation’s chief executive.

As much less mellow protesters set fire to trash cans on K Street and President Donald Trump’s triumphant Inauguration Day parade turned past vacant bleachers, activists with DCMJ-the organization behind the successful 2014 ballot measure that legalized marijuana possession and cultivation in Washington, D.C. accomplished their goal to mark the occasion with a protest toke.

Though the use of cannabis is legal in the District, it remains illegal on federal property-of which there is quite a bit in the seat of the federal government. That said, there were no arrests of marijuana protesters that DCMJ knew of, the organization tweeted at midday Friday.
Friday’s #Trump420 demonstration had been in the works since December.

Disappointed with a total lack of clarity as to what Trump planned to do about America’s widening experiment with marijuana legalization, DCMJ announced Trump, attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions or another decider on Team Trump would have to notify the nation that cannabis would be left as-is. If not, the inauguration party would have a smoking section.

To date, Trump himself has said nothing about marijuana. Sessions, in his Senate confirmation hearings, said very little aside from stating the obvious: that marijuana is federally illegal, and if he’s sanctioned as attorney general-as looks likely-it’s his job to enforce the law. Not exactly encouraging, and more than enough reason to take to the streets with other activists upset with America’s prospects under its new president.

DCMJ originally vowed to roll and pass out 4,200 joints-you know, 420 times 10-among Trump supporters gathered on the National Mall. By the middle of the week, the tally was increased to 5,500 joints, and on Friday morning, organizers said they had 8,000 joints ready to distribute.

According to organizers, “Hundreds” of people gathered and lined up at Dupont Circle to grab a joint before an organized march toward the Mall. On the way, organizers distributed the protest joints in the crowds of Trump supporters assembled to celebrate the transition of power. True to their word, it was a nonpartisan affair, with plenty of star-spangled happy Americans accepting the gift of free weed.

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Marijuana Stocks, Inauguration Day, & Trump’s Bump

Here we are, just after the official inauguration day of our 45th President of the United States of America, Donald Trump. A lot has been said about him over the last few years during the election race but what many may not have expected was a clear “Trump Bump” for marijuana stocks.


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Facts Regarding Denver’s New Marijuana In Public Law

Denver has begun working on the country’s first law allowing use in public places like coffee shops and cannabis clubs. However, the details about what those marijuana clubs would look like are still unclear. Here are some answers to questions about the cannabis clubs headed to Denver.


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Veterans In Support Of Medical Marijuana



Indiana American Legion reached an agreement on Sunday that would support a medical cannabis study to treat injuries to military service members, such as traumatic brain injuries and PTSD. The veteran service organization said they are working to urge Indiana legislators to approve the private growth and research of medicinal cannabis and to reclassify marijuana as a drug with potential medical value.


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