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Donald Trump

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Jeff_Sessions_Legal_Marijuana

“Wait did I read that correctly?” you’re probably asking yourself, right? Mr. Sessions has seemingly been the thorn in the side of the legal marijuana movement and he’s been a topic of great debate for days now. But there may be some shining light ahead to put a bit more ease to those looking at this industry and in their favor. Yes, worries about this “great shift” in federal enforcement in states where recreational legalization has been granted may be able to breathe a little easier right now.

There’s been an immense amount of angst and paranoia with regard to what some have understood as a government crackdown on recreational use. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has had private discussions with a few Republican senators saying that he doesn’t plan to stray away from the Obama-placed policy of granting states the ability to enact their own marijuana laws for their residents.

Sessions has been a strong force to be reckoned with after he ordered a review of the “hands-off” policy that President Barack Obama previously had. But apparently Mr. Sessions has had a bit of a change of heart and in private conversations, has assured senators before he was confirmed that he didn’t have too much consideration about drastically changing the enforcement laws; even though he’s not a fan of the drug’s use.

Here are a few quotes from these informed senators:

“Nothing at this point has changed,” said Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.)

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things. And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not the [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

-Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky)

“We respectfully request that you uphold DOJ’s existing policy regarding states that have implemented strong and effective regulations for recreational use. It is critical that states continue to implement these laws.”

-Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) & Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska)

“Do they really respect states’ rights? Then you should respect all of them, not just pick and choose the ones that you want to support or not. Many states have gone not only the path of Nevada of recreational marijuana but medical marijuana. How can you pick or choose one or another?”

-Sen Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada)

A group of bipartisan senators also had submitted a letter on Thursday that pushed for Sessions to keep the Obama-era policy intact in order to let states decide on how to implement recreational marijuana laws. Sen. Warren and Sen. Murkowski lead the effort; both of who are from states who’s already put legalized marijuana laws in place.

To date, 8 states and Washington, D.C. have laws in place that legalize marijuana for recreational use. Most senators who signed on the letter are from those states with Murkowski being the only Republican. The others include:

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington
Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon
Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon
Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington
Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts
Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii
Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada
Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey
Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado

The concern isn’t just among senators from those states but is an issue among many conservatives who are nervous about the GOP being selective about allowing the rights of states to supersede federal law.

“We’re concerned about some of the language that we’re hearing. And I think that conservatives who are for states’ rights ought to believe in states’ rights. I’m going to continue to advocate that the states should be left alone,” Paul said.

Sen. Gardner was even more direct with the opinion on Sessions’ comments, “He was talking about if there’s cartels involved in illegal operations, they’re going to crack down on that. That’s what everybody’s saying. I still haven’t heard Jeff Sessions say that. We obviously want to make sure we’re clear on what they’ve said.”

Despite the shake-up that Sessions almost single-handedly ignited with his comments about “not being a fan of expanded use of marijuana,” or how despite him being open to states passing laws that they choose, he made it a point to say, “it does remain a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not,” senators like Murkowski seem unshaken. In fact Murkowski said that she wasn’t alarmed and is simply monitoring the DOJ closely, “It’s probably a little premature to try to predict what may or may not be coming out of the administration on this, so I think we just need to sit back and see.”

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One of the decisions President Donald Trump will have to make is whether to move forward with the federal government’s hands off policy on cannabis, which has allowed the sale of the substance in 27 states. President Trump’s nominee for attorney general, Senator Jeff Sessions, has signaled that the new administration could end the practice of allowing states to legalize marijuana. Sessions stated, “It’s not so much the attorney general’s job to decide what laws to enforce. We should do our job and enforce laws as effectively as we’re able.”

Paul Callan and Danny Cevallos, from CNN, were asked for their views on the subject.

1. Cannabis is illegal under federal law. It’s a Schedule 1 controlled substance. Does the President have an obligation to enforce the law as written until the law is repealed?
Danny Cevallos: Yes. As a criminal defense attorney you might think I’d be anti-enforcement instead of pro-enforcement. But there’s no question that the President and the Attorney General are charged with enforcing the law. Arbitrary or selective enforcement of existing law is itself an abuse of power. The Equal Protection Clause already prohibits the “selective enforcement” of a law based on standards like race or religion. The broad discretion of the executive branch or a prosecutor to charge identical defendants with different crimes creates a real threat of unequal, and unconstitutional, treatment. If you want to legalize marijuana, the solution for the federal government is not to be willfully blind to existing federal law. That sends a bad message. The solution is to be proactive: get rid of the outdated federal law.

Paul Callan: No. Sure, Danny is correct that the President and the Attorney General are supposed to enforce the laws as written, but there is also an important concept called prosecutorial discretion. The government has limited resources and can choose to focus on terrorists, kidnappers, murderers and big-time white collar criminals rather than pot smokers listening to Daft Punk’s latest rendition of “Human After All.” The statute books are filled with laws that are not being enforced because they are obsolete and legislators haven’t gotten around to repealing them. There are an abundance of such laws listed in numerous internet sites. But more serious examples are closer at hand. For example, in 2013 the Justice Department issued a memo from Deputy Attorney General James Cole outlining a limited enforcement policy of only prosecuting federal marijuana criminal violations in cases of violence, interstate smuggling, distribution to minors and in matters of adverse impact on public health. Attorney General nominee Sessions would be wise to follow the Obama approach here, and President Trump should understand that there are a lot of electoral votes in those weed-legal states. And as for my friend Danny Cevallos; it is time for him to face reality and, as they say in Colorado, “chill.”

2. President Obama has excused thousands of drug offenders serving substantial amounts of time in prison for the sale and possession marijuana. Should President Trump continue with the Obama pardon policy given the number of states which have now legalized the drug?

Callan: Yes. President Trump would be wise to follow the example of his predecessor by making use of the pardon and commutation power, with care and discretion. The prisons are filled with inmates who have been sentenced to lengthy prison sentences for drug-related crimes. Many have gotten old in prison and no longer pose a threat to society. Many were unjustly convicted. We have seen a massive increase in costly, wrongful conviction lawsuits throughout the nation. Members of America’s minority communities have been aggrieved by what they perceive as the mass incarceration of their young men due to unjust drug laws that are no longer relevant in modern America. The pardons and commutations should be carefully monitored to make sure violent criminals are not slipping through the cracks but President Trump should follow President Obama’s example in continuing this policy.

Cevallos: No. Does anyone else think it’s a huge waste of resources for President Obama to pardon federal drug offenders instead of getting rid of the federal law that made many of them federal drug offenders in the first place? Think of the resources frittered away: existing federal law is what causes investigations, arrests, trials, appeals, and incarceration. Then, ultimately the same branch of government that spent all that time and money convicting the person grants a pardon or commutation, effectively canceling out all those resources spent getting the conviction. Wouldn’t it be a lot less expensive to get rid of the federal law that led to the expensive investigation, arrest, trial, appeal, and incarceration in the first place? President Obama’s pardon policy for drug offenders is a good thing, but it’s largely cosmetic, and it only conceals the bruises that the federal government itself continues to inflict upon the citizenry. Paul Callan wants to paint himself as a freedom fighter here, and he’s right that the pardon power is good for freeing those for acts no longer considered crimes. But true freedom isn’t pardoning the crime after the person has been incarcerated. It’s getting rid of the crime itself.

3. Republicans have commonly supported the doctrine of federalism. Should President Trump’s Republican Administration allow the states to experiment with cannabis legalization under the doctrine of federalism?
Cevallos: No. As Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis put it: “it is one of the happy incidents of the federal system that a single courageous State may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” I agree completely with that general sentiment. But marijuana is different. States legalizing pot is “experimenting” with something that is flat-out illegal under federal law. When the threat of federal prosecution hangs over a marijuana shop owner or user, states cannot truly serve as laboratories. It’s hard to experiment when banks, investors, insurance companies, and even attorneys are reluctant to provide necessary services, for fear of federal criminal penalties or professional discipline. Paul Callan may cheer states for their open flouting of federal law, but would he represent a shop owner if he thought the bar association’s disciplinary committee would come after him? Heck no. He’s as afraid of the ethics board as I am. And so are plenty of other lawyers, who fear potential disciplinary action for counseling a client to engage in the business of violating federal law. Everyone loves the idea of civil disobedience, until it’s their turn to actually get hit with the fire hose or the police truncheon.
Callan: Yes. There is a lot of truth in a statement often heard in conservative gatherings: “The states created the federal government and not the other way around.” The Constitution was drafted by founding fathers deeply sensitive to the concept of a limited federal government with a vibrant democracy flourishing at the local level. Nowhere is the leadership of the states more clearly demonstrated than in the approval of recreational and medical marijuana in 27 states at last count. This state laboratory creates a superb opportunity to test different approaches to legalization rather than rely on the alleged wisdom of Cevallos’ elite pals in DC, many of whom have just been unceremoniously kicked out of office in the tumultuous election of 2016. Local authorities will ensure that rather than a “one size fits all” federal approach, the best state ideas will be imitated and implemented by other states. And as for the Cevallos claim that lawyers will never represent weed store owners for fear of an ethics prosecution, the Colorado Supreme Court has just given the weed lawyers the green light to represent marijuana businesses. Perhaps Danny Cevallos should consider opening a Denver office.

4. Should cannabis be legalized because taxing it will lead to a rich source of government revenue?
Cevallos: No. Don’t get me wrong. I think ending federal marijuana prohibition is a good idea. I also hope that taxing the drug will be a good source of revenue for states and the federal government. Paul Callan knows that this is a popular argument. But when you think about it, taxing vices hasn’t always been the cure for all ills. Gambling has been legal and taxed for years in places like Atlantic City, where it is the town’s primary industry. Has anyone strolled down that town’s main drag lately? It’s hardly a monument to American prosperity. Speaking of gambling, how about the lottery? State-sponsored gambling is heavily taxed and supposedly goes to help senior citizens and schools. But, would Paul Callan honestly say that the net effect of the lottery on society has been a good one? Hopefully marijuana taxation will be different. Early reports are positive: marijuana generates a lot of tax revenue in the legalized states. But there’s good reason to remain skeptical.
Callan: Yes, Danny raises a legitimate point that taxing vices often fails to raise the large amounts of revenue promised. Things like the lottery seem to generate more money for state bureaucracies than for education. Although Atlantic City looks grim, the gambling vice tax is thriving in Las Vegas, Indian Reservations around the country and even in Bethlehem, PA in Danny’s home state. The lesson is that you must carefully pick the vice you seek to tax. Given the track record to date marijuana seems a winner on the tax revenue side. In Colorado and Oregon, recreational use has spawned a $7.1 billion tax-generating industry. And for vice comparison purposes, the taxing of alcohol has proven to be quite lucrative to the states. Alcohol taxes yielded over $9 billion in revenues in 2015 with projections of $10.18 billion by 2021. As a drug which is arguably far less dangerous, marijuana is likely to generate an even greater revenue stream. The states are finding it difficult to overlook such a revenue stream given the thriving underground economy where only illegal producers and dealers enjoy the profit. If Mr. Trump really does want to lower corporate and personal income taxes, legalized, taxed marijuana may be of assistance in achieving that goal.

5. Many argue that cannabis is no more dangerous than alcohol, yet it’s illegal under the laws of many states and the federal government. Is it fair to treat the substances differently under law?

Callan: No. Wisely, Cevallos will not even fight me on this one. Marijuana is far less dangerous than alcohol and there is a great hypocrisy in permitting legal sales of the older generation’s vice, alcohol, while locking up younger Americans who partake of the far less dangerous marijuana. Of course it must be conceded that the drug is not without serious risks, particularly for those with a propensity toward drug abuse. This is yet another reason to allow experimentation on a state level to see how legalization works out in the real world. As for the Cevallos argument that a teetotaling POTUS will resist legalization, there are more than a few reasons to suggest otherwise. He has previously indicated support for medical marijuana stating: “In terms of marijuana and legalization, I think that should be a state issue, state-by-state. Marijuana is such a big thing. I think medical should happen, right? Don’t we agree? I think so. And then I really believe we should leave it up to the states.” Washington Post, October 29, 2015 And let’s face it, most liberals and progressives would have to be under the influence of drugs to support him, so there may be new Trump supporters if legalization succeeds. Though, let’s hope the new president maintains his teetotaling ways as heaven help us all if POTUS starts smoking “Trump Weed” before preparing his next 3 a.m. tweet.
Cevallos: No. Paul Callan has me here. Prohibiting marijuana and allowing alcohol makes zero sense. But then again, nothing about vice crimes is “fair” or even “logical.” In fact, alcohol is much more dangerous than marijuana. Not only is it bad for your body, it’s a major contributor to accidents, and violence. But the real question is: could Mr. Callan convince Mr. President? Our new POTUS is a self-described teetotaler, a nondrinker and non-drug user. And he’s not the kind who stopped drinking because he used to have a problem, who hit a Bukowski-like bottom and turned his life around in AA. Trump is the kind who says he has never had a sip of alcohol in his life. Those people are intense. They usually like order and control. It’s easy to imagine Trump might be intolerant of vices like marijuana. Then again, he’s been socially liberal in many ways too. It’s hard to predict where his administration will come down on the marijuana industry.

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Recently Jeff Sessions held his confirmation hearing, during which he was asked various types of questions from Senators. Some of those questions specifically dealt with the subject of marijuana. The nomination of Jeff Sessions for United States Attorney General has caused a great amount of risk in the marijuana world, both in America and overseas. President Donald Trump has made remarks in the past that he supports reform, but has also made comments contradicting what he previously said.

If you are an ‘actions speak louder than words’ person like me, then the nomination of Jeff Sessions likely scares you to your core. Jeff Sessions gave answers to the marijuana-related questions from his confirmation hearing. Those answers were neatly compiled and included in today’s ‘Tom Angell Report. The Tom Angell Report is jam packed with all types of marijuana information, whether it be local, state, national, or international news.

  • “While I am generally familiar with the Cole memorandum, I am not privy to any internal Department of Justice data regarding the effectiveness and value of the policies contained within that memorandum. I will certainly review and evaluate those policies, including the original justifications for the memorandum, as well as any relevant data and how circumstances may have changed or how they may change in the future.”

    “I will not commit to never enforcing Federal law. Whether an arrest and investigation of an individual who may be violating the law is appropriate is a determination made in individual cases based on the sometimes unique circumstances surrounding those cases, as well as the resources available at the time.”

    A new federal court ruling that a Congressional rider prevents the Justice Department from going after people complying with state medical marijuana laws “is relatively recent, and I am not familiar with how other courts may have interpreted the relevant appropriations language or the Ninth Circuit’s opinion. As an emerging issue, that is one that will need to be closely evaluated in light of all relevant law and facts. I will conduct such a review. Of course, medical marijuana use is a small part of the growing commercial marijuana industry.”

    Regarding “good people don’t smoke marijuana,” “My words have been grossly mischaracterized and taken out of context. I was discussing the value of treating people for using dangerous and illegal drugs like marijuana, and the context in which treatment is successful.”

    “I echo Attorney General Lynch’s comments [on marijuana being illegal], and commit, as she did, to enforcing federal law with respect to marijuana, although the exact balance of enforcement priorities is an ever-changing determination based on the circumstances and the resources available at the time.”

    “I will defer to the American Medical Association and the researchers at the National Institutes of Health and elsewhere about the medical effects of marijuana. Without having studied the relevant regulations in depth, I cannot say whether they may need to be eased in order to advance research; but, I will review this.”

    The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to recognize Sessions’ nomination but Democrats have hinted they will try to set back the vote.

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“America first” floated into a cloud of marijuana smoke.

A marijuana-themed protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration went off as planned this past Friday, with over thousands of cannabis joints passed out to the people and at least several hundred smoked four minutes into Trump’s first address as the nation’s chief executive.

As much less mellow protesters set fire to trash cans on K Street and President Donald Trump’s triumphant Inauguration Day parade turned past vacant bleachers, activists with DCMJ-the organization behind the successful 2014 ballot measure that legalized marijuana possession and cultivation in Washington, D.C. accomplished their goal to mark the occasion with a protest toke.

Though the use of cannabis is legal in the District, it remains illegal on federal property-of which there is quite a bit in the seat of the federal government. That said, there were no arrests of marijuana protesters that DCMJ knew of, the organization tweeted at midday Friday.
Friday’s #Trump420 demonstration had been in the works since December.

Disappointed with a total lack of clarity as to what Trump planned to do about America’s widening experiment with marijuana legalization, DCMJ announced Trump, attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions or another decider on Team Trump would have to notify the nation that cannabis would be left as-is. If not, the inauguration party would have a smoking section.

To date, Trump himself has said nothing about marijuana. Sessions, in his Senate confirmation hearings, said very little aside from stating the obvious: that marijuana is federally illegal, and if he’s sanctioned as attorney general-as looks likely-it’s his job to enforce the law. Not exactly encouraging, and more than enough reason to take to the streets with other activists upset with America’s prospects under its new president.

DCMJ originally vowed to roll and pass out 4,200 joints-you know, 420 times 10-among Trump supporters gathered on the National Mall. By the middle of the week, the tally was increased to 5,500 joints, and on Friday morning, organizers said they had 8,000 joints ready to distribute.

According to organizers, “Hundreds” of people gathered and lined up at Dupont Circle to grab a joint before an organized march toward the Mall. On the way, organizers distributed the protest joints in the crowds of Trump supporters assembled to celebrate the transition of power. True to their word, it was a nonpartisan affair, with plenty of star-spangled happy Americans accepting the gift of free weed.

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Marijuana Stocks, Inauguration Day, & Trump’s Bump

Here we are, just after the official inauguration day of our 45th President of the United States of America, Donald Trump. A lot has been said about him over the last few years during the election race but what many may not have expected was a clear “Trump Bump” for marijuana stocks.


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Facts Regarding Denver’s New Marijuana In Public Law

Denver has begun working on the country’s first law allowing use in public places like coffee shops and cannabis clubs. However, the details about what those marijuana clubs would look like are still unclear. Here are some answers to questions about the cannabis clubs headed to Denver.


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Veterans In Support Of Medical Marijuana



Indiana American Legion reached an agreement on Sunday that would support a medical cannabis study to treat injuries to military service members, such as traumatic brain injuries and PTSD. The veteran service organization said they are working to urge Indiana legislators to approve the private growth and research of medicinal cannabis and to reclassify marijuana as a drug with potential medical value.


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How Have Marijuana Stocks Performed Post Trump?

Here we are, the official inauguration day of our 45th President of the United States of America, Donald Trump. A lot has been said about him over the last few years during the election race but what many may not have expected was a clear “Trump Bump” for marijuana stocks.

As we’ve said in the past, a lot of marijuana stocks are event driven. Going all the way back to 2014 and during the years to follow, catalysts in the cannabis market can be tied to actual events in many cases. For this most recent jump in marijuana stock prices, we see that an election year and a not so conservative President may be the event to thank for this.

In this article we’ll briefly explore some of the most active and most bullish marijuana stocks in the market to give a clear example of “where we’ve been” and what we might be able to look forward to as to “where we’re going”.

OWC Pharmaceutical Research Corp. (OWCP) 3,512%

This company has been building steam since October and just recently went into overdrive to all time highs. Through its subsidiary, One World Cannabis, the Israeli-based company develops cannabinoid-based therapies that target different medical conditions. This was another cannabis biotech company that saw the impact of Trump coming into office instead of Clinton (who was very bearish on biotech).

In late October just before the elections, OWCP saw its first noticeable move from under $0.03 and initially ran to highs of $0.215. Following the consolidation period heading into the end of the year (as most marijuana stocks saw), January opened the door for this stock to run as high as $0.95

OWCP_Marijuana_Stocks

 

Rocky Mountain High Brands (RMHB)
271%

We’ve reported on this company and followed it for a few years. Even before when it was “Totally Hemp Crazy (THCZ)” this stock saw one of the biggest breakouts that we’ve every witnessed. It went from sub penny to highs of 0.32 within weeks. Now it appears that chart has demonstrated a similar Trump Bump that many of the other marijuana stocks have also seen.

In early October, volume began to build, RMHB ran from $0.031 to highs of $0.07. After consolidating back to 0.03-0.04, RMHB has now seen its 2017 rally trigger and has now managed to run past $0.11. Rocky Mountain is a consumer goods company specializing in brand development of health conscious, hemp-infused food and beverage products. The Company currently markets a lineup of four naturally flavored hemp-infused beverages (Citrus Energy, Black Tea, Mango Energy and Lemonade) and a low-calorie Coconut Lime Energy drink. Rocky Mountain High Brands also offers hemp-infused 2oz. Mango Energy Shots and Mixed Berry Energy Shots, as well as a Relaxation Brownie.

Marijuana Stock

Ubiquitech Software Corp. (UBQU)
304%

UBQU follows a similar trend where even though it hasn’t broken above its year end highs, the stock has seen a reversal that started at the beginning of 2017. A lot of questions were raised regarding a previously announced name change and recently the company gave clear guidance on this for 2017 that has brought attention back to the stock from market bulls. Its final name change will be Endo BioSciences Inc., and HempLife Today™ will continue to be the main subsidiary of the company.

HempLifeToday™ focuses on the exciting and dynamic new thinking in the world today that recognizes the important health and life enriching enhancement that CBD Oil from the Hemp plant can bring. Through its network of quality USA growers HempLifeToday.com™ has developed multiple and proprietary CannazALL™ CBD oil products that include; its popular CBD Tinctures, Oils, GelCaps, CBD Powder, Skin Salve, Wax Crumble, and e-liquid.

marijuana stocks

mCig, Inc. (MCIG)
1,265%

A company that we’ve kept up with for the better part of the last year, MCIG became another clear example of what marijuana stocks have started to look like after Donald Trump was elected President. The company has been making many key strides over the last few months including posting some of its best numbers in history.

This includes MCIG currently holding over $10 million in order/contract backlog (as of their last PR in December). In similar fashion to OWCP, shares of MCIG saw a bump in late October when the stock moved from under $0.04 to as high as $0.218. After consolidating in early December, MCIG manage to rally strong heading into the end of the year and recently hit highs of $0.505.

cannabis stocks

Axim Biotechnologies, Inc. (AXIM)
3,941%

Another company that we’ve been following very closely, this has been one of the biggest runners of the year amid heavy volatility. Another cannabis biotech, the company focuses on the research, development and production of cannabis-based pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic products. Our flagship products include CanChew®, a CBD-based controlled release chewing gum, and MedChew Rx, a combination CBD/THC gum that is undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis. MJNA is also an investor in AXIM.

In late October the stock was trading just under $0.50 moved to a high of $10 before consolidating to levels between $7.50-$8. Wouldn’t you know it, heading into the beginning of 2017 the stock broke the sideways trend and moved to highs of $19.80.

cannabis stock

Vitality Biopharma (VBIO)
361%

A company that many of us are familiar with, this cannabis biotech had a smaller run a few weeks before we started picking up coverage. In early October, the stock moved up from around $0.92 to highs of $1.84. After pulling back to lows in December, we began looking at this company at $0.98 and watched as it ran to highs of $4.24. The company is a cannabis biotech focusing on treating disease through its prodrug utilizing cannabinoids for the treatment of serious neurological and inflammatory disorders.

marijuana

Cannabis Science (CBIS)
469%

The company specializes in the development of cannabinoid-based medications and recently announced a collaborative research agreement with Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Their initial focus is on skin cancers, HIV/AIDS, and neurological conditions. The Company is proceeding with the research and development of its proprietary drugs as a part of this initial focus: CS-S/BCC-1, CS-TATI-1, and CS-NEURO-1, respectively.

From October 3 to October 19 CBIS jumped from $0.0169 to as high as $0.077. After pulling in during December, the stock kicked off the new year with a big bull run all the way to highs of $0.0961 for the year so far.

cannabis

Hemp Inc. (HEMP)
103%

One of the most vocal companies on Hemp production in the US, Hemp Inc. They’ve continued to push for a ubiquitous acceptance for all uses of the hemp plant for years now and have targeted North Carolina to grow over 3,000 acres of hemp.

“We are proud to collaborate with other American industrial hemp farmers as we now become part of the modern industrial hemp farming movement. This is a turning point for America and it’s a turning point for Hemp, Inc. Hemp, Inc. has the infrastructure in place to process millions of pounds of hemp fibers and stalks a year, on a commercial level. Our 70,000 square foot industrial hemp processing facility, on over 9 acres in Spring Hope, North Carolina, is the only one of this magnitude in North America. The industrial hemp crop is part of history in the making and it is something that will prove to be lucrative not only for the farmers in North Carolina but for Hemp, Inc. as well,” said CEO Bruce Perlowin in a recent PR.

HEMP saw a bump in volume early in October, the stock ran from $0.0276 to $0.056 before consolidating in late November/December, and has once again begun to aggressively climb back from that price channel.

hemp

Cannabis Sativa, Inc. (CBDS)
195%

With multiple subsidiaries, this company has products ranging from hemp oils & capsules to cannabidiol infused bottled water and even its own patented cannabis plan named Ecuadorian Sativa (Patent PP27,475). Back in late September the stock was trading around $2.80 per share before it jumped up to highs of $8.25. After consolidating for weeks leading up to the new year, CBDS has once again followed suit of many marijuana stocks having now climbed back above $8.

CBD

OH CANADA!

This leads us to our “neighbors up north” because we haven’t just seen a boom from US marijuana stocks alone. The trend has echoed into Canada with some of the most anticipated IPOs so far this year

Emblem Corp. (TSXVENTURE:EMC)(OTCQB:EMMBF)
55%

Emblem Corp, a Licensed Cultivator out of Paris Ontario is one of the most watched and anticipated offerings that has come out of Canada in the last few months. Beyond the fact that they are already growing cannabis and revenue producing investors have taken note of one of their founders and current President, a gentleman by the name of John Stewart.

No, not John Stewart from the Daily Show even though that would be awesome, John Stewart former CEO of Purdue Pharma one of the largest private biotech companies in the world and creators of OxyContin. We see the potential long term to create a cultivator/Biotech hybrid in which case Emblem could be the Next GW Pharma of Canada.

Marijuana IPO

InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (OTCQB: IMLFF) (CNSX: IN)
326%

This company has been following the same pattern as many of the other cannabis biotechs but also comes with what looks to be a stock promotion behind it. The company recently appointed Jeff Charpentier, CPA, CA as InMed’s Chief Financial Officer & Corporate Secretary as well as Martin Bott to its Board of Directors; Bott has worked at Eli Lilly & Company since 1988 and held a variety of roles in the U.S., Switzerland, Germany, and the UK.

InMed is a pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that specializes in developing novel therapies through the research and development into the extensive pharmacology of cannabinoids coupled with innovative drug delivery systems. IMLFF saw a rise in price early in October (shocker right?), a period of consolidation leading up to the new year, and since that ball dropped, the stock has been on the run moving from $0.10 in October to highs of $0.4261 just a few days ago.

Marijuana Stocks

Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSXV: ACB) (OTCQB: ACBFF)
179%

The company’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Aurora Cannabis Enterprises Inc., is a licensed producer of medical cannabis pursuant to Health Canada’s Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) and operates a 55,200 square foot, expandable, state-of-the-art production facility in Mountain View County, Alberta, Canada.

They just announced that the company has officially surpassed 12,000 registered patients within the first 12 months of product sales in Canada. They also announced that they had signed a Joint Venture Research Agreement with Radient Technologies Inc. (“RTI”). The first phase of this venture will include screening experiments of extraction conditions, while phase two includes larger scale experiments related to extraction throughput and optimal extraction conditions. Aurora’s scientists and the RTI team will commence tests January 16, 2017, and the first phase is expected to be completed within approximately six weeks, so something to keep an eye on here in our opinion.

Likewise with the other stocks, the market activity has followed suit even though Aurora has differed by not breaking a new high this year as compared to the high it made in November. But the new uptrend on the chart could be a key indicator for future potential. Since October (at $1.06), shares of ACBFF has seen two and possibly three clear runs; One that saw highs of $1.89 before consolidating, another that saw highs of $2.96 before consolidating, and possibly a new uptrend forming now in January.

Buy marijuana stocks

These are just a few marijuana stocks that have demonstrated a near identical move in the market both leading into the election and leading up to the inauguration. We’ve said it before and most likely will say it again: Marijuana Stocks can very much be event driven so something to keep in the back of your head as we watch 2017 unfold. As investors become more informed on the industry itself, we’ll keep our had on the pulse to find the real story behind some of the biggest marijuana stock moves in the market today.

 

 

 

 

 


 

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If the American people are concerned with Republican Senator Jeff Sessions’ approach to implementing federal cannabis laws, he says Congress should adjust them. Sessions, who President-elect Donald Trump has chosen to become U.S. attorney general, answered questions on cannabis among other issues during his confirmation hearing on Tuesday. Sessions did not offer a clear stance on what cannabis enforcement would look like under his justice department. Sessions stated, “I won’t commit to never enforcing federal law, but absolutely it’s a problem of resources for the federal government. Good judgement on how to handle these cases will be a responsibility of mine, which won’t be an easy decision, but I will try to do my duty in a fair and just way.”

Even though 28 states have made medical cannabis legal and eight states have passed recreational laws, the federal law still classifies marijuana as an illegal substance. The drug is classified as a Schedule I drug along with heroin. In the past, Sessions has made it clear he is against the legalization of marijuana. He said, “Good people don’t smoke marijuana.” However, in a Trump presidency, he would be asked to follow the Trump agenda and not his own. This gives the cannabis industry hope.

Almost 60% of Americans support the legalization of cannabis in the United States. The seven states that voted to legalize medical or recreational use are looking to take steps toward legalization. “It’s not so much the attorney general’s job to decide what laws to enforce. We should do our jobs and enforce laws effectively as we’re able. The U.S. Congress made the possession of marijuana in every state, and the distribution, an illegal act. If that’s something that’s not desired any longer, Congress should pass a law to change the rule,” Sessions said during his hearing.

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The Farm, a pot shop in Boulder, Colorado is staffed with cannabis advocates, known as “bud-tenders.” The shop is booming, to the benefit of all Boulder’s residents. The city’s sales tax on recreational marijuana is almost 23% and high demand for warehouse space from cannabis farmers points to a boom. Colorado is expected to have collected almost $135 million from marijuana taxes last year. Following its example, recreational marijuana will be legal in seven states and Washington, DC. Another 24 states allow cannabis to be used for medicinal purposes.

Because marijuana is still illegal under federal law, any pot shop is, in effect, a US attorney-general’s impulse away from closure. Senator Jeff Sessions, whom Trump has nominated to be attorney-general, has a different view. He said, “We need grown-ups in Washington to say marijuana is not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized.” He also stated, “good people don’t smoke marijuana.” Trump has taken conflicting positions on the issue. When Trump was campaigning, he said whether marijuana should be legal was a matter for individual states to decide. But he also called Colorado’s cannabis regime “a real problem.” Vice-president-elect Mike Pence has presided over one of America’s toughest anti-cannabis administrations.

Marijuana advocates are worried. Andrew Freedman, Colorado’s director of marijuana a coordination said, “There’s very good reason to be concerned. This could become an enforcement priority.” A spokesman for The Farm, Adam Dickey, agreed. “It’s a little scary, we are very concerned, though we’re not in full-on panic mode yet,” Dickey stated. It’s difficult to envision Senator Sessions carrying out the clampdown he wants. Almost 60% of Americans say they are in favor of legalizing pot. That represents a swelling consensus in favor of legalization. There is no reason to expect that increasingly casual attitude to go into reverse. Legalizing marijuana looks largely successful.

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On Election Day, residents of California made their vote to become the world’s biggest legal marijuana market, along with seven more states who also voted yes on recreational or medical pot. Originally, President-elect Donald Trump’s shocking victory didn’t seem to pose an immediate threat to the legal pot industry; Trump isn’t popular in the cannabis world, but he’s not seen as a committed prohibitionist either.

At a post-election industry conference in Vegas, the largest controversy involved a nearly naked model covered in cold cuts. That outlook changed after Trump picked Sen. Jeff Sessions, an Alabama Republican, as his nominee for attorney general. While many conservatives have relaxed their outlook on both marijuana and criminal penalties for drug offenses, Sessions evidently has not.

“We need grown-ups in charge in Washington saying marijuana is not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized,” he said at a hearing in April.

“It is, in fact, a very real danger.” To liberals, the Sessions nomination is, as the New York Times editorialized, “An insult to justice.” Sessions had been rejected for a federal judgeship in 1986 due to concerns that he’s a racist.

His nomination in 2016 to the far more powerful position of attorney general raised an immediate outcry from, among others, those concerned with the treatment of undocumented immigrants, the rights of LGBTQ and Muslim Americans, and supporters of criminal justice reform and police accountability. The legal marijuana industry, which is anticipated to top $6 billion in sales this year, also has reason to fear Sessions, but its response has been much more muted.

The National Cannabis Industry Association, the industry’s largest lobby, released a statement saying that it looked forward to working with Attorney General Sessions. They think it’s safer to weather his tenure at the Justice Department than to fight it.

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Avid Donald Trump supporter, Governor Paul LePage, tried to convince Maine voters that legalizing recreational marijuana would be a “deadly” disaster for the state, to no avail. The Governor of Maine is now trying to do away with medicinal cannabis.

On Election Day voters barely approved question 1, which legalizes two and a half ounces of cannabis and six mature plants for adults 21 and over. Since the margin of victory was so close, the opponents requested a recount. Now delayed because of a lack of volunteers from the opposing side to help count, the results will have to wait until 2017.

While awaiting results LePage is trying to convince the state legislature to do away with medicinal marijuana. “Why do we need medical marijuana? I see no need,” he stated during an interview on Thursday with news radio station WGAN. “You don’t need a prescription to buy a Bayer aspirin. Why do you need a prescription to buy medical or recreational marijuana?”

Governor LePage appeared in a t.v. ad in which he falsely stated that the legalization of marijuana has led to many traffic deaths in other states and that “people addicted to marijuana are three times as likely to become addicted to heroin.”

When Maine voters didn’t fall for it, LePage threatened that he’d be “talking” to President-elect Donald Trump about the state’s cannabis concern. Trump has selected Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions to run the Justice Department. Sessions once stated that “good people don’t smoke marijuana.”

If that doesn’t help undo things, Governor LePage will see if he can get the state legislature to debilitate the will of the voters and do away with medical cannabis he stated during his radio interview.

“If there ever were a bill that the legislature should just kibosh, that’s it,” he stated. To make matters worse LePage would also like higher taxes on marijuana sales if they decide to keep it around.

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