Tags Posts tagged with "Hemp"

Hemp

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A Senate panel approved a proposal permitting South Carolina farmers to grow industrial hemp through a pilot program set up with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture. The proposal would create a system to regulate the growing, selling, and importation of industrial hemp in conjunction with the Department of Agriculture and for study by an academic facility, such as Clemson University. Senators recently took testimony from law enforcement officials who cited issues with the Senate proposal and instead encouraged them to allow the House legislation to work its way through the system.

Executive director with the S.C. Sheriffs’ Association, Jarrod Bruder, said though law enforcement typically has concerns about industrial hemp, all parties worked together to reach a compromise in the House. The House version limits the number of farmers in the first years of the program to fifteen and allows law enforcement to do random testing of the plants to ensure marijuana is not being grown. Bruder stated, “We got to a point in the House where, I wouldn’t say we endorse it, but it got to a point where we could hold our nose and say it was good. It was something that we could live with.”

The measure passed a Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources subcommittee three to one, with members saying they planned to amend the proposal in the full committee to address the concerns of law enforcement. Senator Rex Rice voted against the proposal. In addition to oil, hemp can be made into products such as rope, clothing, paper, canvas, soap, and even some food and drinks, such as butter and milk. The Senate proposal is similar to one that will be going to the full House Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs Committee.

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Palmer Republican Shelley Hughes introduced a proposal recently (Senate Bill 6) that would Permit for the creation of an Alaska hemp industry fully separate from commercial cannabis. Hughes said she introduced the proposal after hearing from farmers in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough who would like to cultivate hemp, particularly to feed livestock. Hughes said, “I’m hoping it maybe, in a small way, opens up an economic opportunity for Alaskans.” She noted the vast array of goods that can be created from hemp (some estimate more than 25,000 possible products) including food and construction materials.

It is still unknown if the crop will be profitable in Alaska. Hughes pointed to a 1916 document from the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations that says hemp “fruited abundantly” during a summer crop in the then-territory. Former Senator Johnny Ellis introduced a similar proposal last session that did not make it through the Legislature. Hughes had to reintroduce it, and adjusted it after reviewing hemp federal guidelines. Under the proposal, hemp would be considered an agricultural product, and excluded from Alaska’s definition of cannabis. The hemp industry would be managed by the Division of Agriculture, instead of the Alcohol and Marijuana Control Office.

Strictly controlled, state-run hemp pilot programs were made legal at the federal level by the 2014 Federal Farm Bill. Under Senate Bill 6, Alaska’s farmers would be able to produce, process, and sell hemp. An individual, college, or the Alaska Department of Natural Resources could partake in the pilot program. Hemp would be defined in Alaska statutes as cannabis sativa L., containing no more than 0.3 percent THC. That’s the common definition both at a federal and state level, which the California-based Project CBD says originated from a 1976 taxonomic report by a Canadian plant scientist who never intended to create the legal standard for cannabis vs hemp.

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Senator Sonny Borrelli, a Republican senator from Lake Havasu City sees economic opportunity in industrial hemp and wants to bring it into Arizona. Borrelli has sponsored a proposal to establish the groundwork for an industrial hemp industry in the state. If the measure is passed, Senate Bill 1337 would legalize the farming, sale, and distribution of industrial hemp. It would task the state’s agricultural department with oversight, regulation, and licensing of the industry. The bill passed 26-4 with bipartisan support in the Senate and is now in the House.

Borrelli stated, “It’s good policy. It’s economic development, and it’s good for the agriculture community.” Borrelli praised the benefits of hemp production as an economic driver, saying it would create jobs and essentially bring Arizona into a growing industry. He added that hemp could also prove a big boost for agriculture in the water-sensitive state because it requires less water than cotton to grow. The measure comes with its opposition.

Senator David Farnsworth was one of four senators who voted against the proposal. Although he sees the commercial benefits of hemp, Farnsworth said it could pose a challenge for law enforcement officers to distinguish between a small hemp plant and a small cannabis plant. He said, “Enforcement of our marijuana laws would be more difficult if we have a lot of hemp growing.” Farnsworth also expressed concern that hemp may be a backdoor approach to legalizing cannabis. Borrelli argued that there’s a misunderstanding about hemp’s association with cannabis.

The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classified cannabis and its cannabinoids as a Schedule I controlled substance. This also impacted hemp because it possesses the cannabinoid Tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly referred to as THC, the part of the plant that produces a high. However, the level of THC in hemp is very low compared to cannabis. For example, the maximum THC content of legal industrial hemp in most states is about .3%, whereas NBC News reported the average THC content in Colorado’s legal marijuana to be 18.7%.

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Hemp

Legislation was recently passed by the Senate that would update Kentucky law setting regulations for hemp production in the state that’s at the leading edge in the crop’s comeback. Senators voted 35-0 after little talk to send the bill to the House. It was a big change from four years ago, when Kentucky’s original law that laid the groundwork for state farmers to eventually grow brought stiff resistance.

Senate Majority Floor Leader Damon Thayer, one of the bill’s sponsors stated, “It has gone mainstream, and a lot of the concerns that were expressed four years ago have proven to be unfounded.” The state’s experiment with hemp production is yielding more acreage and processors. State agricultural officials approved 209 applications from growers, allowing them to produce up to 12,800 acres of hemp this year. Experimental projects began in the state with a mere 33 acres in 2014. In 2016, almost 140 growers were approved to plant up to 4,500 acres.

Growing hemp without a federal permit has long been banned because of its classification as a controlled substance related to cannabis. Hemp and cannabis are the same species, but hemp has a negligible amount of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives cannabis users a high. Hemp got a limited reprieve from the 2014 federal Farm Bill, which allows state agriculture departments to assign hemp projects for research and development. Kentucky’s initial hemp law was enacted before Congress permitting hemp’s limited return. State Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles recently stated, “There were a lot of things that could not have been predicted about the Farm Bill exemption. So this basically better aligns Kentucky law with the Farm Bill.”

The bill would broaden circumstances to ban people from being involved in hemp to include those convicted of any type of felony or any drug-related misdemeanors or violations. Currently, the 10-year restraint applies to people convicted of drug-related felonies. The measure would put into state law an appeals process for people denied licenses to grow hemp or those who have their licenses revoked. The state agriculture department started the appeals process this year as part of department policy for people turned down for licenses. The legislation is the product of months of work by University of Kentucky agriculture officials, the state agriculture department, and Kentucky State Police.

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Since growing hemp has been illegal for almost a full century, researchers have been unable to learn all the benefits associated with it. Currently, most states have an active hemp industry or have authorized hemp research.

Hemp is a distinct variety of the cannabis plant but it is not the same as marijuana. Although hemp is commonly associated with marijuana, it should not be.

Industrial hemp and marijuana are two completely different plants, inside and out. Hemp contains a very small amount (less than 1%) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana (the chemical that gets a user high). Legal marijuana has a much larger amount of THC (between 15%-30%).

Benefits of industrial hemp

The benefits associated with hemp are endless. Countless products used by people every day can be created from hemp. Some of these products include the following:

• Paper products: Hemp can be used to make paper and it only takes a couple of months to grow. Hemp is environmentally friendly. It is naturally acid free and can be recycled up to 7 times (normal paper can be recycled up to 3 times).
• Clothing: Hemp can be used to make clothing. One acre of hemp produces as much material as 2-3 acres of cotton.
• Building materials: Hemp can be turned into a variety of building materials. You can build a wall out of hemp that is rot free, pest free, mold free, fire resistant, and will last 500 years. You can also make biodegradable plastic out of hemp.
• Gasoline/Fuel: Hemp can be turned into fuel that can be used in your car today. This is done by pressing the hempseed and turning its oil into a biodiesel that is biodegradable and cleaner for the air. Hemp is not the best alternative for fuel because it takes a lot of hemp to make one gallon of gas.
• Nutrition: Hemp can be used as a supplement for nutrition. Hemp is high in protein, contains essential omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, potassium, and dietary fiber.

A $50 billion industry by 2026

The benefits associated with hemp are endless. However, the best part about it is the conditions which it can grow under. If you look at pictures of New York from the mid-1900s, hemp was growing everywhere.

Hemp has multiple growing seasons and it can be grown in some of the toughest environments. Researches have estimated that the Florida hemp industry could be a $460 million dollar industry per year.

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After an increase in funding, the Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research at the University of Louisville is exploring the economics and science of commercializing industrial hemp. Henry “Hank” Conn, who has committed millions of dollars to fund the center and recently provided $160,000 to jumpstart hemp research said it’s a new line of work for the center but it matches well with its existing examination of biofuels, catalysts, and other chemical applications.

Additional underwriting will come from a large donation established more than 30 years ago by the late Ray Schnur Sr., a member of the first Speed graduating class in 1928 who operated two companies in Louisville. He made an initial endowment gift of $100,000, now more than $350,000, to fund technology purchases for Speed’s electrical engineering department. However, Schnur’s son Ray Jr. and his family asked that the annual proceeds be directed now to Conn’s hemp effort, a move that will soon take effect. “Hemp is the coming thing,” said the younger Schnur, who is 81 and the stepfather of David Barhorst, a Louisville developer and founder of Kentucky Hemp Ventures. Schnur said creating jobs from hemp will “help coal miners and tobacco farmers around the state.”

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture launched a pilot program under authority of the 2014 federal farm bill, which allows states that enact laws to permit hemp growing and research. It has given rise to several businesses that are working with selected farmers approved by the state to create foods and products from hemp fibers and oils. University of Kentucky agronomists have focused on aspects of growing and processing the crop. At Conn, scientists are looking at the potential after the harvest, for pelletizing hemp for biofuel, creating catalysts for various chemical applications and using cellulose as a fuel source, said Andrew Marsh, the center’s assistant director. “This whole thing just took off,” Marsh stated, after the center planted a test plot of hemp in August. Some Speed students did a literature search of hemp research, and Schnur stepped up, offering to redirect the endowment at Conn. To drive their work, center officials assembled a forum in early December with more than three dozen growers, processors, and business people.

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MCIG Sells Stony Hill Corp. an 80% Stake in its VitaCBD Brand

HENDERSON, NV / ACCESSWIRE / February 27, 2017 / mCig, Inc. (MCIG), a diversified company focused on the cannabis industry, announced today that it has entered into an asset purchase agreement with Stony Hill Corp. (STNY) for the purpose of pursuing mutually beneficial business opportunities in the Cannabidiol (CBD) Industry. Under terms of the agreement, MCIG will sell the VitaCBD brand to STNY, in exchange for total consideration of $850,000 in cash and common stock, and a 20% stake in VitaCBD, LLC, a subsidiary of STNY.

Paul Rosenberg, President and CEO of MCIG, commented, “MCIG has worked diligently to build the VitaCBD product line, but recognizes the need for a strategic partner to assist in branding and marketing of the product. After months of discussions and negotiations, we believe we have found that partner with Stony Hill. We are very bullish on the future revenue potential of VitaCBD and its ability to create value for our company and its shareholders.”

VitaCBD is a highly dedicated group devoted to engineering the purest hemp derived products available. Both hemp and marijuana contain dozens of cannabinoids, naturally occurring chemical compounds, but it is cannabidiol (CBD), in particular, that offers the potential for health and therapeutic benefits without the high. Hemp plants typically contain elevated levels of health-enhancing CBD, but by definition contain only trace levels of THC. This makes the hemp plant attractive to those seeking its potential health benefits as part of an antioxidant-rich lifestyle.

Chris Bridges, President of STNY, stated, “This transaction will expand Stony Hill’s platform of products and accelerate its growth strategy in the industry. Stony Hill and mCig will have a synergistic relationship, combining management and personnel with a dedicated focus on the promotion and deployment of the VitaCBD brand. We are excited to have mCig as a strategic partner and a shareholder in Stony Hill.”

About mCig, Inc.

Headquartered in Henderson, Nevada, mCig Inc. (MCIG) is a diversified company servicing the legal cannabis, hemp and CBD markets via its lifestyle brands. MCIG has transitioned from a vaporizer manufacturer to an industry leading, large scale, full service cannabis cultivation construction company, with its Grow Contractors division currently operating in the rapidly expanding Nevada market. The company looks forward to growing its core competencies to service the Ancillary legal Cannabis, Hemp, and CBD markets, with broader expansion to take place once federal laws change. For more information, visit www.mcig.org.

Safe Harbor Statement

Any statements contained in this press release that do not describe historical facts may constitute forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any forward-looking statements contained herein are based on current expectations, but are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. The factors that could cause actual future results to differ materially from current expectations include, but are not limited to, risks and uncertainties relating to the Company’s ability to develop, market and sell products based on its technology; the expected benefits and efficacy of the Company’s products and technology; the availability of substantial additional funding for the Company to continue its operations and to conduct research and development, and future product commercialization; and the Company’s business, research, product development, regulatory approval, marketing, and distribution plans and strategies.

Contact:

CEO of mCig, Inc.
Paul Rosenberg
paul@mcig.org

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“Industrial hemp has absolutely no recreational applications. It only has medical and industrial applications. Sorry, you can’t get high on hemp. If there is any federal pushback against recreational marijuana, this would not affect industrial hemp or Hemp, Inc.,” said Bruce Perlowin, CEO of Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP).

Hemp, Inc. Reports: South Dakota on Track to Legalize Industrial Hemp

Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP) executives announce to shareholders today that South Dakota may also join the ranks of states to legalize industrial hemp. According to the South Dakota State Legislature, House Bill (HB) 1204, sponsored and introduced by South Dakota’s Committee on State Affairs, would allow the production and sale of industrial hemp for commercial purposes, thereby setting forth the foundation to end federal prohibition in practice. The Committee on State Affairs introduced House Bill 1204 (HB1204) this month which passed the house with a 51-16 vote before moving to the Senate house, for the first read, yesterday.

Bruce Perlowin, CEO of Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP), said, “With the succession of states legalizing or on track for legalizing industrial hemp, the industrial hemp industry in America is rapidly reaching a tipping point. Hemp, Inc. forecasted this tipping point years ago and started developing the solid infrastructure for what we have in place today. That infrastructure includes our commercial multi-purchase industrial hemp processing facility in North Carolina, industrial hemp farming in North Carolina, Nevada, Arizona (and more states soon), marketing systems to market in the U.S. and globally, and an educational component (‘The Hemp University’ in North Carolina). This has put us at the forefront of this multibillion dollar emerging industry as a leader while we continue to collectively build a new clean green agricultural and industrial American Revolution.”

Under the proposed law, any person meeting the statutory requirements could plant, grow, harvest, possess, process, sell, and buy industrial hemp with a license issued by the South Dakota Department of Agriculture. Current federal law regarding industrial hemp authorizes hemp farming by research institutions only for research purposes while farming for commercial purposes by individuals and businesses remains prohibited. HB1204, however, exercises its state’s rights and simply ignores federal prohibition and authorizes commercial farming and production.

While prospective hemp growers would still have to take federal law into consideration, by eliminating the state requirement for federal permission, the South Dakota law would eliminate a major obstacle to widespread commercial hemp farming within the borders of the state. According to an article on the Tenth Amendment Center Blog, “Farmers in SE Colorado started harvesting the plant in 2013, and farmers in Vermont began harvesting in 2014, effectively nullifying federal restrictions on such agricultural activities. On Feb. 2, 2105, the Oregon hemp industry officially opened for business and one week later, the first license went to a small non-profit group.” With that being said, “as more people engage in hemp production and the market grows within these states, more people will become emboldened creating an exponential wave, ultimately nullifying the federal ban in effect.”

So what is making industrial hemp so important to Americans and so important to states that they are willing to simply ignore a federal ban now? As the uninformed become informed on the difference between hemp and marijuana and the fog of ignorance dissipates, a miracle crop stands in clear sight as ways to help the economy and expand sources of revenue are sought.

“Industrial hemp has absolutely no recreational applications. It only has medical and industrial applications. Sorry, you can’t get high on hemp. If there is any federal pushback against recreational marijuana, this would not affect industrial hemp or Hemp, Inc.,” said Perlowin.

Industrial hemp can be used for a wide range of products, including fibers, construction, food, paper, insulation materials, textiles, cosmetic products, and beverages, to name a few and is estimated to be used in more than twenty-five thousand products spanning multiple markets (agriculture, textiles, recycling, automotive, electronics, furniture, food/nutrition/beverages, paper, construction materials, personal care and others).

“It’s no doubt that industrial hemp industry is here to stay and it’s only going to grow very rapidly now that it has reached a tipping point. Trying to slow that evolutionary progress down is like trying to sweep back an incoming tide with a broom. State legislatures are taking action to promote industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity and now the time has come for South Dakota to do the same,” said Perlowin.

As more states legalize industrial hemp, more opportunities become available for Hemp, Inc. to process the raw hemp. Hemp, Inc.’s commercial, large scale, 70,000 square foot industrial hemp processing facility, on 9 acres of land in Spring Hope, North Carolina is the only one of this magnitude in the entire western hemisphere. The milling portion of Hemp, Inc.’s industrial hemp processing facility has just been completed which strategically expands the company’s worldwide industrial base for producing hemp-based products. Hemp, Inc.’s industrial hemp processing facility is bound to become the mecca of this new clean green agricultural and industrial American revolution.

To see the most recent video of the mill being completed, click here. To see the video of America’s largest hemp processing facility (70,000 square feet under roof, on 9 acres) and 60-foot silo installation, click here.

Aligned with Hemp, Inc.’s Triple Bottom Line approach, Perlowin is exploring the possibilities of developing Hemp Growing Veteran Village Kins Communities in South Dakota (similar to the 500-acre demonstration community being built in Arizona where Perlowin plans on growing 300 acres of hemp this year) that would consist of smaller lots for Kins Domains (eco-villages). “The eco-villages would also include organic gardens, natural beehives, a pond, a living fence and other elements,” said Perlowin.

From rehabilitation to job creation, Perlowin says this model presents a holistic solution to those individuals that all Americans owe a great debt of gratitude towards… the American veterans. Perlowin expects this model to produce very lucrative revenue for Hemp, Inc., the veterans themselves and the local communities these Kins Communities are built near. “The infrastructure for ‘The Hemp Growing, CBD-Producing, Veteran-Village Kins Community,’ which takes time to build, is already in place in Arizona which I’ve been building for the last 4 years and can be duplicated in South Dakota,” concluded Perlowin.

THE HEMP UNIVERSITY
The Hemp University has been established to be the blueprint for farming, navigating and thriving in the industrial hemp revolution. With the goal to educate its attendees on key topics such as transitioning from traditional farming to organic farming, different hemp cultivar strains, how and where to get certified seeds, planting and harvesting industrial hemp, an in depth history of hemp and its many uses, agronomy, permaculture, ecological advantages and many more courses with an ever expanding curriculum. Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP) has secured an outstanding lineup of experts from at least a dozen states all over the country, including New York, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Nevada, Colorado, Oregon and Kentucky and more for the 2017 season.

Classes will also cover such topics as organic certification, potential licensing fees, what’s happening with industrial hemp in different states around America, high CBD strains and different CBD extraction technologies (which will also be installed and showcased at Hemp, Inc.’s processing facility) and marketability of the crop. The seminars are expected to start March 18, 2017.

Hemp retail products from all around the country will be showcased at The Hemp University. Attendees will also be able to connect with potential industrial hemp distributors and product manufacturers. Our new “Hemp Hub” will be a one stop shop for every aspect of industrial hemp from seed and soil to sale. Providing as many resources as possible to our American farmers and land owners to successfully grow hemp and have sales channels for the potential 25,000 products our hemp industry can produce.

For those interested in attending, teaching, touring the hemp field and hemp processing facility or showcasing your company’s hemp products, at The Hemp University, visit www.thehempuniversity.com. With less than 30 days and 50 slots available for land owners and farmers, it’s advisable to purchase your ticket(s) today at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/farming-hemp-for-profit-tickets-32189961040.

SUBSCRIBE TO HEMP, INC.’S VIDEO UPDATES “Hemp, Inc. Presents” is capturing the historic, monumental re-creation of the hemp decorticator today as America begins to evolve into a cleaner, green, eco-friendly sustainable environment. What many see as the next American Industrial Revolution is actually the Industrial Hemp Revolution. Watch as Hemp, Inc., the #1 leader in the industrial hemp industry, engages its shareholders and the public through each step in bringing back the hemp decorticator as described in the “Freedom Leaf Magazine” article “The Return of the Hemp Decorticator” by Steve Bloom.

Freedom Leaf Magazine, one of the preeminent news resources for the cannabis, medical marijuana, and industrial hemp industry in America, is published by Freedom Leaf, Inc., a fully reporting, audited, publicly traded company on OTC Markets. Stay in the loop with Freedom Leaf Magazine as it continues to deliver the good news in marijuana reform with some of the most compelling art, entertainment, and lifestyle-driven industry news in the cannabis/hemp sector. On the go? Download the Freedom Leaf mobile app to stay connected as they transform the delivery of cannabis news and information across the digital landscape. Get the mobile app on Apple iOS or Google Play.

“Hemp, Inc. Presents” is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by visiting www.hempinc.com. To subscribe to the “Hemp, Inc. Presents” YouTube channel, be sure to click the subscribe button.

ABOUT INDUSTRIAL HEMP
Hemp is a durable natural fiber that is grown as a renewable source for raw materials that can be incorporated into thousands of products. It’s one of the oldest domesticated crops known to man. Hemp is used as a nutritional food product for humans and pets, building materials, paper, textiles, cordage, organic body care and other nutraceuticals, just to name a few. It has thousands of other known uses. A hemp crop requires half the water alfalfa uses and can be grown without the heavy use of pesticides. Farmers worldwide grow hemp commercially for fiber, seed, and oil for use in a variety of industrial and consumer products. The United States is the only developed nation that fails to cultivate industrial hemp as an economic crop on a large scale, according to the Congressional Resource Service. However, with rapidly changing laws and more states gravitating towards industrial hemp and passing an industrial hemp bill, that could change. Currently, the majority of hemp sold in the United States is imported from China and Canada, the world’s largest exporters of the industrial hemp crop.

To see the video showcasing the dramatic footage of our hemp and kenaf grows, click here.

To see 1-minute daily video updates (from Hemp, Inc. CEO Bruce Perlowin) on the final phases of completion of Hemp, Inc.’s 70,000 square foot industrial hemp processing facility and milling operation and other developments, click here. (Remember to scroll down to see the other videos of this historical event of building an American industrial hemp processing facility and factory from the ground up.)

HOW HEMP CAN CHANGE THE WORLD
Industrial, medicinal and commercial properties of hemp have been known to mankind for decades. Cultivating hemp does not require any particular climate or soil, and is thus found in all parts of the world and has been found to be a better alternative than other raw materials. Hemp products can be recycled, reused and are 100% biodegradable. The growth speed of the plant is fast enough to meet the increasing industrial and commercial demand for these products. Switching to hemp products will help save the environment, leaving a cleaner and greener planet for the next generation.

“The hemp crop grows dense and vigorously. Sunlight cannot penetrate the plants to reach the ground, and this means the crop is normally free of weeds. Its deep roots use ground water and reduce its salinity. Also, erosion of topsoil is limited, thereby reducing water pollution. The roots give nitrogen and other nutrients to the soil. After the harvest, this soil makes excellent compost amendments for other plants, and hemp cultivation can follow the rotation of agriculture with wheat or soybean. In fact, the same soil can be used to grow hemp for many years, without losing its high quality. The hemp plant absorbs toxic metals emitted by nuclear plants into the soil, such as copper, cadmium, lead and mercury.” (Source: http://www.hempbenefits.org)

To see 1-minute daily video updates (from Hemp, Inc. CEO Bruce Perlowin) on the final phases of completion of Hemp, Inc.’s 70,000 square foot industrial hemp processing facility and milling operation and other developments, click here. (Remember to scroll down to see the other videos of this historical event of building an American industrial hemp processing facility and factory from the ground up.)

ABOUT NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL HEMP ASSOCIATION
“Through education we believe that the law of our state can be changed to allow the growing, processing, and sale of Hemp and Hemp products within North Carolina in a responsible manner. Through education, dedication and fundraising, North Carolina can be accelerated to the forefront of global growth in Industrial and Medicinal Hemp. North Carolina can and should lead the country in cultivation, processing and support the consumption of hemp’s many beneficial products. Hemp was, for almost 200 years, a legal and fundamental crop in North Carolina and should be again. Farmers should be able to grow and consumers buy Hemp products grown and processed in our state.”

Visit www.ncindhemp.org for more information. To join the North Carolina Industrial Hemp Association, click here.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL HEMP ASSOCIATION
NHA represents hemp farmers, processors, manufacturers, start-up businesses, entrepreneurial endeavors, and retailers and strives to build a viable industrial hemp economy by providing education about the benefits of hemp and providing expert consultation to producers and processors entering the hemp industry. NHA has developed close relationships with local and state government agencies to establish regulations that benefit the hemp industry across the nation. We provide a wealth of expertise in fields ranging from mining and agriculture to hemp materials processing and the latest developments pertaining to laws and regulations. For more information on the National Hemp Association, visit www.NationalHempAssociation.org.

HEMP, INC.’S TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE
Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP) seeks to benefit many constituencies from a “Cultural Creative” perspective, thereby not exploiting or endangering any group. CEO of Hemp, Inc., Bruce Perlowin, is positioning the company as a leader in the industrial hemp industry, with a social and environmental mission at its core. Thus, the publicly traded company believes in “up streaming” a portion of its profits back to its originator, in which some cases will one day be the American small farmer, American veterans and others — cultivating natural, sustainable products as an interwoven piece of nature. By Hemp, Inc. focusing on comprehensive investment results — that is, with respect to performance along the interrelated dimensions of people, planet, and profits — the triple bottom line approach can be an important tool to support its sustainability goal.

SOCIAL NETWORKS:
http://www.twitter.com/hempinc (Twitter)
http://www.facebook.com/hempinc (Facebook)
http://investorshangout.com/Hemp-Inc-HEMP-87248/ (Investors Hangout)

To see the video showcasing the dramatic footage of our hemp and Kenaf grows, click here.

To see 1-minute daily video updates (from Hemp, Inc. CEO Bruce Perlowin) on the final phases of completion of Hemp, Inc.’s 70,000 square foot industrial hemp processing facility and milling operation and other developments, click here. (Remember to scroll down to see the other videos of this historical event of building an American industrial hemp processing facility and factory from the ground up.)

SAFE HARBOR ACT
Forward-Looking Statements are included within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. All statements regarding our expected future financial position, results of operations, cash flows, financing plans, business strategy, products and services, competitive positions, growth opportunities, plans and objectives of management for future operations, including words such as “anticipate,” “if,” “believe,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “could,” “should,” “will,” and other similar expressions are forward-looking statements and involve risks, uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control, which may cause actual results, performance, or achievements to differ materially from anticipated results, performance, or achievements. We are under no obligation to (and expressly disclaim any such obligation to) update or alter our forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For Investor Relations, please send correspondence to:
ir@hempinc.com

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Hemp, Inc.
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info@hempinc.com

http://www.hempinc.com

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By Jason Spatafora @WolfofWeedSt

“I fear the Greeks, even those bearing gifts.”- Virgil

The DEA’s recent cannabis research expansion is a Harry Houdini inspired smoke show of misdirection all to set up the next trick; there I said it. While some view it as a positive first step, I tend to think it served a very deliberate function. Optically it played directly into expected vitriolic fallout from advocates, activists and media touts, all of which lined up to ignite their “DEA should reschedule cannabis” torches. In a “perfect world” scenario these people aren’t wrong, cannabis isn’t Heroin’s equal & 1+1=2, but just as fire cannot exist in a vacuum, neither can a rational cannabis debate. And while everyone on the side of reason is shouting in unison about rescheduling they failed to see that they might have just had their pockets picked. DEA’s policy statement that everyone seemed to ignore there are 33 words that have the potential to create the legal framework for the monopolization of Cannabis by means of an exclusionary application process.

Prologue – August 10th, 2016

Russ Baer, a staff coordinator for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) media affairs wing gave a response to Steven Nelson of USNEWS.com via email. Nelson later shared a screen grab of the email via tweet. The statement made to him from this Drug Enforcement Administration staff coordinator read:

“Tomorrow morning (August 11th, 2016) the Drug Enforcement Administration will be making some important announcement regarding Marijuana related topics that will be published in the Federal Register. Because of your interest and/or prior engagement with the DEA on this subject, the DEA office of National Media Affairs is reaching out to you regarding these anticipated announcements.”

Over the next 24 hours social media was a blaze, with many people within the industry uncovering the fact that Rescheduling wouldn’t happen and that the DEA response would have to do with research. As expected, the incendiary scheduling of cannabis debate raged on into the following day.

August 11th, 2016

As expected, the Drug Enforcement Administration disappointed the advocates and activists of medical marijuana by not removing or rescheduling marijuana from its class 1 controlled substance status. Yet the DEA, in all of its benevolence, offered a consolation prize of sorts, by “deciding” to expand the study of Medical Marijuana for researchers, Universities & drug companies outside of the confines of a single federally legal facility. The facility, to refresh your memory is located at the University of Mississippi, (ranked 164th in Bio Sciences) and had up to this point been the sole research monopoly on legally grown marijuana, courtesy of the NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse).

DEA’s Misdirection Strategy

Over the next few days it seemed that every headline following the DEA’s deliberation was about the archaic rescheduling system & how cannabis is safer statistically than opiates that are schedule 2. Some media outlets went as far as to paint a “glass half full” picture. The LA Times for example did a piece titled “DEA ends its monopoly on marijuana growing for medical research.” The social reaction from cannabis enthusiasts, advocates and potrepreneurs from Main Street to Wall Street was as expected with everyone chiming in on social media to wag their fingers at the DEA. Representative Barbara Lee, a congresswoman from Oakland California stating via tweet “Politicians aren’t doctors or scientists. Marijuana research prohibitions are outdated, unscientific, & dangerous for those who need #MMJ.” As expected the rhetoric from the cannabis side was “The DEA is bad, the War on Drugs is a complete failure, Big Pharma is to blame,” so on and so forth.

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The people aren’t wrong on many of these points. The War in Drugs is a failure when considering addiction has been plateauing since its 1970 inception and US drug control spending is up 2000%, which to date stands at $1.5 trillion dollars. We can go on and on as to where that money went, what industries it created (prison industrial complex), the people it disproportionately targeted (minorities), but that’s a whole other article or book for that matter. Big Pharma however does have its trillion dollars hands in this story, but more on that later as I’ve digressed.

Not to go back and pick on the LA Times click-bate headline of “DEA ends its monopoly on marijuana growing for medical research,” but did it really end the monopoly? Let’s evaluate the idea. Yes, a monopoly is defined as “the exclusive possession or control of the supply or trade in a commodity or service.” The University of Mississippi was in fact in exclusive possession of the NIDA edict to legally grow marijuana and study it. On the surface the Monopoly has ended, but the reality is that we are just switching out the term Monopoly for an Oligarchy. Is an oligarchy any different than a monopoly in the sense that it’s just a smaller group carving out the biggest slices for themselves, eliminating competition by means of out maneuvering or outspending their opponent in an effort to influence policy such as this? Consider that the biggest lobby against the cannabis Industry is the pharmaceutical industry, yet they’re simultaneously studying cannabis for the purpose of synthesizing its many chemical compounds to create their high margin drugs.

Currently, their high margin bread and butter are the opioids for pain management such as OxyContin, Percocet and their generic versions of each. The drug companies are experts at isolating molecules from nature to create drugs that cost pennies to manufactures. In a zero sum game, cannabis is a direct threat to pharma companies, by snatching billions in profit and simultaneously causing billions in losses. Anti-cannabis lobbies would also be at risk as the pharmaceutical giants that feed them down on K Street would lose out on easy paydays. These anti-Marijuana lobbyists provide a micro look at the systemic problems within American politics illustrating how/why elected officials in Congress consistently vote against the interests of their collective constituency and bring forth carefully crafted bills or amendments like this one.

On the DEA’s policy statement and legal considerations section, under, legal applicable considerations it states.

“Second, as with any application submitted pursuant to section 823(a), in determining whether the proposed registrationwould be consistent with the public interest, among the factorsto be considered are whether the applicant has previous experience handling controlled substances in a lawful manner and whether the applicant has engaged in illegal activity involving controlled substances. In this context, illegal activity includes any activity in violation of the CSA (regardless of whether such activity is permissible under State law) as well as activity in violation of State or local law. While past illegal conduct involving controlled substances does not automatically disqualify an applicant, it may weigh heavily against granting the registration.”

Translation, grow marijuana even in a state where it’s legal and you are going to have a hard time becoming a manufacturer or researcher for the DEA’s new policy, thus excluding tier one cultivators in practice and likely creating a perpetual home for cannabis on the scheduling list. Prohibition’s end could very well be right around the corner, but the fear is in the form of legal medical marijuana at a Walgreens near you. I asked the DEA’s Russ Baer directly if the inserted language above in bold would be a non-starter for current cultivators wanting to become manufacturers as they are in clear Violation of CSA? In a written statement to Marijuana Stocks the DEA’s official response was:

“DEA is serious about facilitating marijuana research and that there is a lawful pathway for doing so. This DEA decision will facilitate increased research involving marijuana, within the framework of the law and U.S. treaty obligations, to enhance the drug’s supply available to researchers. The goal of this historic and monumental policy shift is to increase the amount and variety of marijuana available to researchers and make it easier for researchers to obtain marijuana as compared to current system under which marijuana must be obtained from NIDA. Growers must become registered with DEA, following the submission of an application, which DEA will evaluate in accordance with the CSA. Registered growers will need to comply with all CSA regulatory requirements, such as quotas, record keeping, order forms, and maintenance of control against diversion. Marijuana produced under this proposal may only be supplied to DEA-registered manufacturers and researchers, and only for purposes authorized by the CSA.

All potential new drugs, including drug products made from marijuana, are subject to the rigors of the drug approval process mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). This drug approval process requires that before a new drug is allowed to enter the U.S. market, it must be demonstrated through sound clinical trials to be both safe and effective for its intended uses,” stated Russ Baer of the Drug Enforcement Agency.

When asked if the inserted language also creates an unfair advantage for Pharma companies the response from the Drug Enforcement Administration circled back to the CSA (Controlled Substance Act) stating that the “DEA has adopted a new policy, consistent with the CSA and U.S. treaty obligations, under which additional entities may become registered with DEA to grow and distribute marijuana for research purposes. DEA will evaluate each application it receives to determine whether adding such applicant to the list of registered growers is necessary to provide an adequate and uninterrupted supply of marijuana to researchers in the U.S. In addition, applicants must demonstrate their ability to safely secure the drugs to prevent diversion, while abiding by the approved research protocol.”

The Controlled Substance Act

Everything points back to the Controlled Substance Act, a bill that was introduced into the Congress by Harley Staggers and took less than 6 weeks to get passed by the Senate and signed into law by President Richard M. Nixon. The signing of this document not only created the “War on Drugs,” but put an enforcement agency (DEA) in charge of Cannabis scheduling, circumventing the FDA in a move that creates an inter-agency firewall of sorts. The DEA’s position on why the FDA, who already regulates pharmaceutical drugs, isn’t in charge of marijuana rescheduling was point blank, “The Controlled Substances Act provides a mechanism for substances to be controlled (added to or transferred between schedules) or decontrolled (removed from control). The CSA provides roles for DEA and the FDA. Proceedings to add, delete, or change the schedule of a drug or other substance may be initiated by DEA, HHS, or by petition from any interested party. Once initiated, the process involves a deliberate and collaborative interagency exchange.”

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In Laymen’s terms CSA effectively says “DEA you’re in charge of this, FDA you’re in charge of that.” Unfortunately, Marijuana will never be completely removed from the scheduling list unless there is a major political overhaul in every branch of government, if and only if elected officials stop letting lobbies pour honey in their ears and money into campaigns. The reality from my perspective is that the DEA is a scapegoat, the perfect Boogey Man, simply because their job is to follow orders. They are soldiers in a sense, adhering to the guidelines of the Controlled Substance Act (CSA), a legal document crafted by a congress, molded in the image of benefactors, used to fuel a fake war and create cottage industries.

The DEA knows marijuana is safer than Oxy and that’s not speculation that’s a direct quote. They don’t want to go after the mother transporting medication to her sick child because they’re suffering from seizures. They want the dangerous individuals like El Chapo or the pill mills slinging Oxy off the streets. They have no interest in going after all cultivators following state law to the letter. Are there exceptions, of course! Does it make these comments directly from them any less true? No.
DEA’s direct position on which drug is more dangerous from a consumption standpoint as it relates to Cannabis vs OxyContin? “There were more than 47,000 drug overdose deaths in 2014, or approximately 129 per day, more than half (61 percent) of which involved either a prescription opioid or heroin. Marijuana meets the statuary criteria of a Scheduled I controlled substance, and has been determined to have a high abuse potential with no currently accepted medical use. Schedule I includes some substances that are exceptionally dangerous (including heroin and LSD) and some that are less dangerous (including marijuana, which is less dangerous than some substances in other schedules).” When asked point blank, what’s more dangerous Oxy or Marijuana DEA says “Oxy.”

Robert Capecchi, Director of Federal Lobbying at the Marijuana Policy views medical marijuana legalization as a means to an opioid end as well as fiscal no brainer with far reaching benefits.

“Ending marijuana prohibition will allow licensed businesses to cultivate, distribute, and sell marijuana to adults. Unlike the criminal market, a legal and regulated market means products are pure, tested and labeled, sales are taxed, and business disputes are resolved in the courts, not with violence. Additionally, there is promising evidence to suggest that legal access to medical marijuana reduces the rates of opioid overdoses and the reliance on prescription pain killers.”

Foregone Conclusion?

Prohibition’s end could very well be right around the corner, but would we want it in the form of legal medical marijuana at a Walgreens near you? August 11th’s ruling was either one of many dominos in the quest for the monopolization of cannabis or just a pessimistic idea based off of history repeating itself. Regardless of which reality we are presently in, it doesn’t hurt to try and connect the dots, but if I can leave you with one last thing it’s the number 6630507. In case you’re wondering that’s the United States patent # they filed for cannabis in 2003 citing “multiple therapeutic uses.” I can only postulate why they did that….

Regards,

Jason Spatafora

Drug War

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Since growing hemp has been illegal for almost a full century, researchers have been unable to learn all the benefits associated with it. Hemp is a distinct variety of the cannabis plant but it is not the same as marijuana. Although hemp is commonly associated with marijuana, it should not be.

 

The benefits associated with hemp are endless. Several products which are used by people every day can be created from hemp. These include paper, clothing, building materials, fuel, and nutrition.

 

The best part about growing hemp is the conditions which it can grow under. If you look at pictures of New York from the mid-1900s, hemp was growing everywhere. Hemp has multiple growing seasons and it can be grown in some of the toughest environments. Researches have estimated that the Florida hemp industry could be a $460 million-dollar industry per year.

 

Capitalizing on Hemp

 

Industrial hemp and marijuana are two completely different plants, inside and out. Hemp contains a very small amount (less than 1%) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana (the chemical that gets a user high). Legal cannabis has a much larger amount of THC (between 15%-30%).

 

The surge in the number of publicly traded cannabis companies has made it difficult for investors to focus on legitimate investments in the industry. One of these is a NYSE-traded holding company, Compass Diversified Holdings (CODI).

 

The company offers investors the opportunity to invest in a company levered to the industrial hemp industry and offers a dividend.

 

What Does Compass Do?

 

Compass owns and manages a diverse family of established North American middle market businesses. In July, CODI finalized the acquisition of Fresh Hemp Foods Ltd., for $132.5 million (CAD) and sold its CamelBak Products, LLC subsidiary to Vista Outdoor Inc.

 

Fresh Hemp was founded in 1998 in Winnipeg, Canada and operates under the name Manitoba Harvest. The company produces and sells its products online and through retail stores in North America. Manitoba offers hemp hearts, heart bites, protein powders, oils, and food starter packs.

 

Manitoba’s products are currently carried in approximately 7,000 retail stores across the United States and Canada. During the fiscal year that ended on November 30, 2014, the company generated $37.9 million (CAD) in revenue, which represents a 23.9% increase on a year-over-year basis. Manitoba has continued to see significant revenue growth during the first half of its current fiscal year and they generated $27.6 million of revenue during this time.

 

CODI offers investors an 8.3% dividend yield or $1.44 in cash distributions per year. The company’s dividend has grown consistently over the years and its financial stability is secure, especially after the sale of its CamelBak subsidiary.

 

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