Hillary Clinton Supports the Reclassification of Marijuana

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It seems that Hillary Clinton has loosened up on marijuana restrictions during a town hall on Saturday in South Carolina. Clinton announced that she supported the same reclassification of the drug that Bernie Sanders suggested last week for research to be conducted for medical purposes.

“A lot more states have passed medical marijuana than have legalized marijuana, so we’ve got two different experiences or even experiments going on right now,” Hillary stated. “The problem with medical marijuana is that there’s a lot of anecdotal evidence about how well it works for certain conditions, but we haven’t done any research.”

Clinton said that the reason for this is because marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 substance along with dangerous drugs such as heroin, LSD, and ecstasy. The Drug Enforcement Administration defines schedule 1 drugs as drugs “with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” However, if it was not classified so highly, many more doors would open up for legal research.

“Researchers at universities, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), could start researching what’s the best way to use it, how much of a dose does somebody need, how does it interact with other medications,” she added.

On Saturday at the town hall at Claflin University in Orangeburg, Clinton said that she still does not support pot legalization, but that the federal government should study states that have already legalized to learn more. Clinton is the last presidential candidate to support reclassification following Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. He began criticizing Clinton’s actions, though.

“I am glad to see Secretary Clinton is beginning to address an issue that my legislation addressed,” Sanders said in a statement, “but her approach ignored the major issue. Secretary Clinton would classify marijuana in the same category as cocaine and continue to make marijuana a federally regulated substance. If we are serious about criminal justice reform and preventing many thousands of lives from being impacted because of criminal convictions for marijuana possession, we must remove marijuana from the federal Controlled Substances Act and allow states the right to go forward, if they choose, to legalize marijuana without federal legal impediments.”

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